Iran-Contra Affair

(redirected from Arms-for-hostages)
Also found in: Legal, Encyclopedia.

Iran-Contra Affair

A scandal from 1986 over secret deals to sell arms to Iran and divert the proceeds to fund Contra rebel forces in Nicaragua.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Kerry may believe he made a Nobel-worthy breakthrough akin to Nixon going to China, but what he actually did was repeat the Reagan-era Arms-for-Hostages scandal, almost to a tee.
Ronald Reagan's bid to get American hostages freed from Lebanon led to an arms-for-hostages Iran-Contra scandal that plagued his second term.
Amid the enthusiasm of the latest sighting, it's worth remembering that the highlight of the Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages debacle was the secret trip to Tehran taken by Robert McFarlane, President Reagan's former national security adviser.
Zarif has been involved in back-channel talks and behind-the-scenes negotiations with the US dating back to the arms-for-hostages deal of the 1980s, and has had contacts with top US officials, including Vice President Joe Biden and Defence Secretary Chuck Hagel.
In a counterculture twist to the 1980s Iran arms-for-hostages deal, she told Marquez she'd only give up Omogrosso for a '60s vinyl album, poster or T-shirt.
To be sure, Reagan faltered midway through his second term -- the arms-for-hostages trade, the Iran-Contra affair, nearly wrecked his presidency.
and Israel since the fall of the Shah of Iran and through the laundry list of major policy errors such as the 1982 Lebanon invasion, the Iran-Contra arms-for-hostages fiasco, and the Second Iraq War.
Despite the disastrous international and domestic consequences of the Iran-Contra scandal, Reagan never regretted the arms-for-hostages policy because, in his eyes, it managed to free three of the men.
Of course, we recall Israel's important role in the Iran-contra scandal: Israeli officials were the intermediaries in the Reagan Administration's covert negotiations with Iran in the infamous arms-for-hostages deal.
The column broke a string of big scandals, from Eisenhower assistant Sherman Adams taking a vicuna coat and other gifts from a wealthy industrialist in 1958 to the Reagan administration's secret arms-for-hostages deal with Iran in 1986.
The Reagan administration negotiated arms-for-hostages with Iranians.
Reagan's second term was marked by a cloud of scandal when members of his administration pursued secret and illegal arms-for-hostages deals with Iran.