Arnold


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Ar·nold

 (är′nəld), Benedict 1741-1801.
American Revolutionary general and traitor whose plan to surrender West Point to the British for 20,000 pounds was foiled when his accomplice John André was captured (1780). Arnold fled to New York and then to England (1781).

Arnold

, Matthew 1822-1888.
British poet and critic whose poems, such as "Dover Beach" (1867), express moral and religious doubts. His Culture and Anarchy (1869) is a polemic against Victorian materialism.

Arnold

, Thomas 1795-1842.
British educator and historian who as headmaster of Rugby School (1828-1842) introduced classes in mathematics, modern languages, and modern history into the classical curriculum.

Arnold

(ˈɑːnəld)
n
(Placename) a town in N central England, in S Nottinghamshire. Pop: 37 402 (2001)

Arnold

(ˈɑːnəld)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Malcolm. 1921–2006, English composer, esp of orchestral works in a traditional idiom
2. (Biography) Matthew. 1822–88, English poet, essayist, and literary critic, noted particularly for his poems Sohrab and Rustum (1853) and Dover Beach (1867), and for his Essays in Criticism (1865) and Culture and Anarchy (1869)
3. (Biography) his father, Thomas. 1795–1842, English historian and educationalist, headmaster of Rugby School, noted for his reforms in public-school education

Ar•nold

(ˈɑr nld)

n.
1. Benedict, 1741–1801, American general in the Revolutionary War who became a traitor.
2. Matthew, 1822–88, English poet and literary critic.
3. his father, Thomas, 1795–1842, English clergyman, educator, and historian.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Arnold - English poet and literary critic (1822-1888)Arnold - English poet and literary critic (1822-1888)
2.Arnold - United States general and traitor in the American RevolutionArnold - United States general and traitor in the American Revolution; in 1780 his plan to surrender West Point to the British was foiled (1741-1801)
Translations
Arnold
Arnold
Arnaud
Arnold
Arnold
References in classic literature ?
As his car slid downtown on Tuesday morning the mind of Arnold Thorndike was occupied with such details of daily routine as the purchase of a railroad, the Japanese loan, the new wing to his art gallery, and an attack that morning, in his own newspaper, upon his pet trust.
A whale wounded (as we afterwards learned) in this part, but not effectually, as it seemed, had broken away from the boat, carrying along with him half of the harpoon line; and in the extraordinary agony of the wound, he was now dashing among the revolving circles like the lone mounted desperado Arnold, at the battle of Saratoga, carrying dismay wherever he went.
And Sir Arnold, and Sir Gauter, knights of the castle, encountered with Sir Brandiles and Sir Kay, and these four knights encountered mightily, and brake their spears to their hands.
Suzanne was one of his favorites, a clever, ambitious girl, made of the stuff of a Sophie Arnold, and handsome withal, as the handsomest courtesan invited by Titian to pose on black velvet for a model of Venus; although her face, fine about the eyes and forehead, degenerated, lower down, into commonness of outline.
Doesn't Matthew Arnold say that somewhere--or is it Swinburne, or Pater?
Hayward talked of Richard Feverel and Madame Bovary, of Verlaine, Dante, and Matthew Arnold.
I think Matthew Arnold says something of the same kind about Lord Byron.
But whenever I hear of Shelley I repeat to myself the words of Matthew Arnold,
For though what may be called professed Wordsworthians, including Matthew Arnold, found a value in all that remains of him-- could read anything he wrote, "even the 'Thanksgiving Ode,'-- everything, I think, except 'Vaudracour and Julia,'"--yet still the decisiveness of such selections as those made by Arnold himself, and now by Professor Knight, hint at a certain very obvious difference of level in his poetic work.
1] Arnold Sherman, an elderly friend of the Irvings, was there at the same time, and added not a little to the general pleasantness of life.
For a sonnet on Stevenson he managed to wring two dollars out of a Boston editor who was running a magazine with a Matthew Arnold taste and a penny-dreadful purse.
Why, I myself have served two terms with Arnold de Cervolles, he whom they called the archpriest.