arrogancy

arrogancy

(ˈærəɡənsɪ)
n
another name for arrogance
References in classic literature ?
Notwithstanding, so much is true, that the carriage of greatness, in a plain and open manner (so it be without arrogancy and vain glory) doth draw less envy, than if it be in a more crafty and cunning fashion.
He could jut out his neck an ell," it was said, "and cast his venom about four rods; a serpent of countenance very proud, at the sight or hearing of men or cattle, raising his head seeming to listen and look about with great arrogancy.
Irving and I were probably among the last products it delivered before gliding off, and then rushing off into self-consciousness, arrogancy, insincerity, jangle, and vulgarity, which I fear are now very much the definition of it.
If Alfonso VI had been tempted to be arrogant and over-confident because of his sudden and complete success in 1072, the inferred Canticle of Hannah (1 Samuel 2:1-10) contained the admonishing text: "let not arrogancy come out of your mouth".
An article published in the Boston Newsletter called the Courant a "Notorious, Scandalous Paper" full of "Nonsense, Unmannerliness, Raillery, Prophaneness, Immorality, Arrogancy, Calumnies, Lyes.
Those of high rank ought to treat their lessers with affability and courtesy, without arrogancy.
The latter was a truth used deceptively to tap into our human arrogancy and sell margarine--a product much closer to plastic than nature.
They are charged with calumny--depraving Horace, "taxing him falsely of selfe-loue, arrogancy, impudence, rayling, filching by translation, etc" (5.