arsenal

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ar·se·nal

 (är′sə-nəl)
n.
1. A governmental establishment for the storing, development, manufacturing, testing, or repairing of arms, ammunition, and other war materiel.
2. A stock of weapons.
3. A store or supply: an arsenal of retorts.

[Italian arsenale, from obsolete arzanale, darsena, from Arabic aṣ-ṣinā'a, manufacture, industry, and dār aṣ-ṣinā'a, place of manufacture : dār, house (from dāra, to turn, revolve; see dwr in Semitic roots) + al-, the + ṣinā'a, manufacture (from ṣana'a, to make; see ṣnʕ in Semitic roots).]

arsenal

(ˈɑːsənəl)
n
1. (Military) a store for arms, ammunition, and other military items
2. (Military) a workshop or factory that produces munitions
3. a store of anything regarded as weapons: an arsenal of destructive arguments.
[C16: from Italian arsenale dockyard, from the original Venetian arsenal dockyard and naval store, from Arabic dār sī n`ah, from dār house + sī n`ah manufacture]

ar•se•nal

(ˈɑr sə nl, ˈɑrs nəl)

n.
1. a military establishment for producing and storing weapons and munitions.
2. a collection of weaponry.
3. a supply of any useful item: a critic's arsenal of vivid phrases.
[1500–10; (< Middle French) < Italian arzanale < Venetian arzanà dockyard]

arsenal

- From Arabic dar al sindah, meaning "workshop for art, manufacture," it was originally used in English to mean "naval dock" or workshops for making ships and arms.
See also related terms for manufacture.

arsenal

A building for manufacturing and storing armaments. Two historic examples are in Venice and Piraeus.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arsenal - all the weapons and equipment that a country hasarsenal - all the weapons and equipment that a country has
armament - weaponry used by military or naval force
2.arsenal - a military structure where arms and ammunition and other military equipment are stored and training is given in the use of armsarsenal - a military structure where arms and ammunition and other military equipment are stored and training is given in the use of arms
military installation - any facility servicing military forces
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
3.arsenal - a place where arms are manufacturedarsenal - a place where arms are manufactured
foundry, metalworks - factory where metal castings are produced

arsenal

noun armoury, stock, supply, store, magazine, stockpile, storehouse, ammunition dump, arms depot, ordnance depot They are committed to destroying most of their nuclear arsenals.
Translations
مَخْزَن أو مَصْنَع أسْلِحَه
zbrojnicezbrojovka
ammunitionsdepotarsenalforråd
arzenál
vopnaverksmiîja; vopnabúr
arsenāls
cephaneliksilâh deposu

arsenal

[ˈɑːsɪnl] Narsenal m

arsenal

[ˈɑːrsənəl] narsenal m

arsenal

n (Mil) (= store)Arsenal nt, → Zeughaus nt (old); (= factory)Waffen-/Munitionsfabrik f; (fig)Waffenlager nt

arsenal

[ˈɑːsɪnl] narsenale m

arsenal

(ˈaːsənl) noun
a factory or store for weapons, ammunition etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the soft opening of the Biennale's central exhibit space in the cavernous Arsenale (the other main venue is the Giardini parkland), Legarda was able to briefly talk with Aravena and to personally invite the Pritzker Prize-winning architect/activist to visit the Philippine pavilion, which runs May 28-Nov.
Then we asked Asier Mendizabal to show inside Oscar's structure, because he had work, a slide projection, that I thought would probably get lost in the Arsenale.
We should have realised that, after a run of three or four Architecture Biennales that have broadly succeeded in pushing forward the confidence, the exploration and the joie de vivre of architecture--a condition that is surely linked to the increased interest in the subject by non-architects--the Arsenale centrepiece would put a stop to it.
Her participation is Swatch's way of establishing a significant presence at both the Giardini and Arsenale venues of the recently opened 56th Venice Art Biennale that is ongoing until November.
The young Portuguese artist Joana Vasconcelos gained broader recognition when one of her major works, A noiva (The Bride), 2001, was included in the 2005 Venice Biennale: At the entrance to the Arsenale hung an outsize chandelier, an elegant structure, nearly twenty feet high, in which the artist had replaced the traditional crystal pendants with cotton tampons--around twenty-five thousand in all.
And so, behind the great sheds of the Arsenale in the appropriately named Giardini delle Vergini, the Chinese constructed a gently inclined slope clad in recycled clay tiles and partly bisected by a promenading ramp.
The first day's "Official Welcome" crackled with tension, as various more or less articulate, passionate, and pin-striped officials either defended the Biennale or--more surprisingly--articulated their dissatisfaction with "business as usual" (a business in which the same visitors were counted three times to get an attendance stat of 900,000: once at the Arsenale and Giardini [265,000], once again at off-site pavilions [370,000], and another time at "collateral" events [280,000]).
In 2002, he mounted an exhibition, Ashes and Snow, in the Corderia of the Venice Arsenale, and invited Shigeru Ban to design a prefabricated gallery in which this show could be displayed in varied locations.
which dominated the opening passage of Rosa Martinez's Arsenale show in last year's Venice Biennale, is probably the most economical yet effective example of Islam's hitching of the fragmented-and-lacking self to our easily activated nostalgia for what we've perceived as valuable, and to our oft-thwarted desire for connection with others.
The work was ultimately shown at this summer's Venice Biennale in the Rosa Martinez--curated Arsenale.
As usual, the action was divided between the Corderie (ropemaking sheds) of the Arsenale (where at its height the serene republic churned out a galley a day), and the Eurovision gaggle of national pavilions in the nearby Giardini.
And for general exhibitions at the Italian pavilion and Arsenale, internationally recognized experts (on this occasion, female for the first time in the Biennale's history, Spanish curators Maria de Corral and Rosa Martinez) are invited to affirm art's universal legibility by giving an overview of global visual production.