thrombosis

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throm·bo·sis

 (thrŏm-bō′sĭs)
n. pl. throm·bo·ses (-sēz)
The formation, presence, or development of a thrombus.

[New Latin thrombōsis, from Greek, a clotting, from thrombousthai, to clot, from thrombos, clot.]

thrombosis

(θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (siːz)
1. (Pathology) the formation or presence of a thrombus
2. (Pathology) informal short for coronary thrombosis
[C18: from New Latin, from Greek: curdling, from thrombousthai to clot, from thrombos thrombus]
thrombotic adj

throm•bo•sis

(θrɒmˈboʊ sɪs)

n.
coagulation of the blood within a blood vessel in any part of the circulatory system.
[1700–10; < New Latin < Greek thrómbōsis. See thrombus, -osis]
throm•bot′ic (-ˈbɒt ɪk) adj.

thrombosis

A condition involving blood clotting within an artery or vein and possibly cutting off or obstructing the flow of blood.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thrombosis - the formation or presence of a thrombus (a clot of coagulated blood attached at the site of its formation) in a blood vesselthrombosis - the formation or presence of a thrombus (a clot of coagulated blood attached at the site of its formation) in a blood vessel
occlusion - closure or blockage (as of a blood vessel)
cerebral thrombosis - a blood clot in a cerebral artery or vein
coronary, coronary thrombosis - obstruction of blood flow in a coronary artery by a blood clot (thrombus)
milk leg, phlegmasia alba dolens, white leg - painful thrombosis of the femoral vein in the leg following childbirth
phlebothrombosis, venous thrombosis - thrombosis of a vein without prior inflammation of the vein; associated with sluggish blood flow (as in prolonged bedrest or pregnancy or surgery) or with rapid coagulation of the blood
thrombus - a blood clot formed within a blood vessel and remaining attached to its place of origin

thrombosis

noun blood clot, embolism, infarction, coronary thrombosis, embolus Thinning of the blood reduces the chances of thrombosis.
Translations
trombóza
trombózis

thrombosis

[θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs] N (thromboses (pl)) [θrɒmˈbəʊsiːz]trombosis f
coronary thrombosistrombosis f coronaria

thrombosis

[θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs] nthrombose f

thrombosis

nThrombose f

thrombosis

[θrɒmˈbəʊsɪs] ntrombosi f inv
coronary thrombosis → trombosi coronarica

throm·bo·sis

n. trombosis, formación, desarrollo y presencia de un trombo;
biliary ______ biliar;
cardiac ______ cardíaca;
coronary ______ coronaria;
embolic ______ embólica;
traumatic ______ traumática;
venous ______venosa.

thrombosis

n (pl -ses) trombosis f; deep venous — (DVT) trombosis venosa profunda (TVP)
References in periodicals archive ?
It also reviews key players involved in the therapeutic development for Arterial Thrombosis and special features on late-stage and discontinued projects.
However, in the setting of both arterial and venous thrombosis the consideration of HITT should be strongly entertained and, even in the absence of venous thrombosis, the presence of multifocal arterial thrombosis should also raise this possibility.
When Zheng Yanliang was diagnosed with severe arterial thrombosis in both legs, he was told that he had just a month to live, the Daily Star reported.
23) The presence of underlying obstructive atherosclerotic disease in combination with prolonged immobility, mechanical compression, and septic shock can lead to arterial thrombosis.
These properties may explain the lack of pain, spasm and more serious morbidity associated with the intra-arterial injection of less water-soluble, alkaline or high tonicity drugs, which may result in vasoconstriction, crystal formation and subsequent arterial thrombosis (1).
Other reported medical events included hemorrhage, venous thrombosis, gastrointestinal perforation, and arterial thrombosis.
As SPS is a common disorder that can be effectively treated with 100 mg/d aspirin, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with unexplained venous or arterial thrombosis.
The things that make it different in the rate of venous thrombosis are much broader than what makes it different in arterial thrombosis.
However, there is little data regarding arterial thrombosis as a complication of bariatric surgery.
Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a type of hypercoagulable state that predisposes to the development of serious and potentially life-threatening thromboembolic disorders such as deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and arterial thrombosis.
The management of patients with arterial thrombosis has yielded poor results.
The expert opined that if the arterial occlusion had been discovered earlier, more likely than not, the leg could have been saved, and that the failure of the nurses to appropriately monitor the decedent resulted in their failure to detect the arterial thrombosis at or near the time it occurred.