birth control

(redirected from Artificial birth control)
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birth control

n.
1. Voluntary prevention of conception by a man or a woman through the use of contraceptive techniques.
2. A contraceptive technique.

birth control

n
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) limitation of child-bearing by means of contraception. See also family planning

birth′ control`


n.
regulation of the number of children born through control or prevention of conception.
[1914, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.birth control - limiting the number of children bornbirth control - limiting the number of children born
coitus interruptus, pulling out, withdrawal method, onanism, withdrawal - a method of birth control in which coitus is initiated but the penis is deliberately withdrawn before ejaculation
natural family planning - any of several methods of family planning that do not involve sterilization or contraceptive devices or drugs; coitus is avoided during the fertile time of a woman's menstrual cycle
contraception, contraceptive method - birth control by the use of devices (diaphragm or intrauterine device or condom) or drugs or surgery
planning - an act of formulating a program for a definite course of action; "the planning was more fun than the trip itself"
Translations
تَحْديد النَّسلتَنْظِيم النَّسْل
antikoncepceantikoncepční politikaregulace porodnosti
præventionbørnebegrænsning
ehkäisy
kontracepcija
születésszabályozás
getnaîarvarnir
避妊
산아 제한
obmedzenie pôrodnosti
födelsekontroll
การคุมกำเนิด
việc sinh đẻ có kế hoạch

birth

(bəːθ) noun
1. (an) act of coming into the world, being born. the birth of her son; deaf since birth.
2. the beginning. the birth of civilization.
birth control
prevention of the conception of children.
ˈbirthday noun
the anniversary of the day on which a person was born. Today is his birthday; (also adjective) a birthday party.
ˈbirthmark noun
a permanent mark on the skin at or from birth. She has a red birthmark on her face.
ˈbirthplace noun
the place where a person etc was born. Shakespeare's birthplace.
ˈbirthrate noun
the number of births per head of population over a given period.
give birth (to)
(of a mother) to produce (a baby) from the womb. She has given birth to two sets of twins.

birth control

تَنْظِيم النَّسْل antikoncepce prævention Geburtenregelung έλεγχος γεννήσεων control de la natalidad ehkäisy contraception kontracepcija controllo delle nascite 避妊 산아 제한 anticonceptie prevensjon kontrola urodzeń controle de natalidade, controlo da natalidade регулирование рождаемости födelsekontroll การคุมกำเนิด doğum kontrolü việc sinh đẻ có kế hoạch 节育
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul penned the 1968 encyclical ''Humanae Vitae'' which enshrined the church's opposition to artificial birth control.
The church's teaching against artificial birth control in Humanae Vitae is: 37% A Prophetic 68% statement and safeguard against sexual permissiveness.
Burke also ordered church groups not to take part in an anti-hunger march because some of the groups in it provide artificial birth control in the Third World.
The ban on artificial birth control is total and absolute" wrote the popular magazine The Catholic Answer.
25) lays the blame of the misery of Third World families at the feet of Pope John Paul II, because the pope continues to uphold two millennia of church teaching against artificial birth control.
Even fewer (10 percent) followed the bishops' line on artificial birth control, down a mere 2 points in 12 years.
For example, the Church authorities say that artificial birth control is a serious sin.
A Searchlight spokesman said: "The group seeks to promote the 'moral order' by opposing abortion, artificial birth control and homosexuality.
Some critics argued that her opposition to artificial birth control and abortion was harmful to India, a nation of more than 900 million.
The euphoria following the council seemed to end with two encyclicals: Sacerdotalis Celibatus (1967), which called for the continuation of mandatory clerical celibacy; and Humanae Vitae (1968), which called for the condemnation of artificial birth control despite the scholarly majority reports demanding policy changes.
Both Borgmann's hypermodem jog and artificial birth control technologies are examples of hyperreality in which we choose to replace the reality of nature by controlling or subjugating it by technological means.
The real question of Humanae Vitae is not the prohibition of artificial birth control.