Asantehene


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Asantehene

(æˈʃæntɪˌhɛnɪ)
n
(Biography) the ruler of the Ashanti people of Ghana
References in periodicals archive ?
On 18th February 1981 the exhibition Asante: The Kingdom of Gold was opened at the Museum of Mankind in London by the reigning Asantehene and occupant of the Golden School, Otumfoo Nana Opuku Ware II.
Personally, meeting the Asantehene, the Ashanti king, was one of the most memorable moments of this tour for my family and me," he continued.
The two main targets of Nkrumah had been the Asantehene and the Okyehene and their powerful state councils.
15) It refers to the Golden Stool, the throne of Asantehene, the king of the Asante, which represented "the people, the soul of the nation and the good fortune of the nation.
The second textile from 1929 carries a photograph of Nana Premeh, the Asantehene.
Interestingly, Obote had strong alignments with Ghana's prime minister, Kwame Nkrumah, who faced similar contestation of anti-republicanism when the Asantes, another powerful 19th'century West African kingdom, which from 1954-57 also argued for a federal system of government through the National Liberation Movement, desired to make the Asantehene or King of the Asantes supreme sovereign of the largest group within Ghana.
Organized on the principle of the African Kingship, on November 15th, 1985 in Ghana, the Asantehene (King of Asante) Otumfou Opoku Ware II (supported by Nana Kwame Akuoko Sarpong, Omanhene (Paramount King) of Agogo Traditional Area) presented the "epoh" Stool to Shekhem Ur Shekhem, Ra Un Nefer Amen I, officially recognizing the Society's Kingship in Ghana.
The establishment would be under the backup of Otumfuo Osei Tutu II, Asantehene and would be moderated by Mr John Saka Addo, former Governor of the Bank of Ghana and Chairman of the Prudential Bank.
The Asantes have a paramount chief, the Asantehene - their equivalent to our Queen - who is universally revered by the tribe.
African kings like the Asantehene of the Gold Coast became indispensable resources in this effort because they were able to mobilize their subjects for all manner of projects, whether it was to join the imperial army, help assemble Hurricanes, or construct airfields, harbors, and roads.
The Sultan of Sokoto in predominantly Muslim northern Nigeria, the Asantehene of Ashanti in Ghana, the Zulu king in South Africa, and the kings of Nso and Bamun in Cameroon are good examples of some African kings for whom politicians and businessmen are at their beck and call.
They preferred to overlook the fact that the Asantehene (king of Asante) had helped to shove their ancestors onto slave ships and refused to admit royal power emanated from "the abuse of human beings and things.