asceticism

(redirected from Ascetic practices)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to Ascetic practices: asceticism, Ascetics

as·cet·i·cism

 (ə-sĕt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The principles and practices of an ascetic; extreme self-denial and austerity.
2. The doctrine that the ascetic life releases the soul from bondage to the body and permits union with the divine.

asceticism

(əˈsɛtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the behaviour, discipline, or outlook of an ascetic, esp of a religious ascetic
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the principles of ascetic practices, esp in the early Christian Church
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the theory and system of ascetic practices

asceticism

a severe self-deprivation for ethical, religious, or intellectual ends. — ascetic, n., adj.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual stateasceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual state
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)
self-denial, self-discipline - the trait of practicing self discipline
monasticism - asceticism as a form of religious life; usually conducted in a community under a common rule and characterized by celibacy and poverty and obedience
3.asceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraintasceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraint
self-control, self-denial, self-discipline - the act of denying yourself; controlling your impulses

asceticism

Translations
زُهـد، تَنَسُّك
askeze
askese
aszkétaság
meinlætalifnaîur
asketizmus
çileciliksofuluk

asceticism

[əˈsetɪsɪzəm] Nascetismo m

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm] nascétisme m

asceticism

nAskese f; a life of asceticismein Leben in Askese

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzm] nascetismo

ascetic

(əˈsetik) adjective
avoiding pleasure and comfort, especially for religious reasons. Monks lead ascetic lives.
noun
an ascetic person.
aˈscetically adverb
aˈsceticism (-sizəm) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
Unfortunately, Abbott's focus on the unhealthy ascetic practices among some Catholic celibates living hundreds of years ago and her failure to mention all but a few healthy examples of other Catholic celibates is a serious flaw in her otherwise engaging book.
7) In India, the forests were dark places of suffering and pain (duhkha), a natural environment for ascetic practices meant to force the monks to confront suffering realistically.
Others who suffer from occupational hazards include Poets, who because of their lives of penury die of hunger; and the religious (the sole clerical category), whose ascetic practices make them all the more vulnerable to death (305v, 307).
82)Chiara's own martyrdom was slef-imposed in the form of strenuous ascetic practices.
Of course many ascetic practices are psychologically pleasurable
To that end, Sufis have for centuries gathered around a spiritual master, seeking either through ascetic practices and pious devotions or through dance, poetry, chant and repetition of God's holy names, to put themselves in tune with the divine.
85) It is by "displaying" the will of God (through ascetic practice) that Demetrias can confirm to herself and others her doctrinally correct belief in divine and human nature; likewise, this correct belief will bolster and facilitate her ascetic practices.
Internalization of ritual by means of ascetic practices focusing on breath control and techniques of respiration led to a catalog of breaths according to existing ritual categories and terminology.
6) Chapter three (Wilderness Dwelling and the Ascetic Disciplines) highlights the text's concern with the ascetic practices (dhutagunas) and wilderness-dwelling (40), an orientation that Boucher notes is prominent in a number of important early Mahayana texts, including the Ratnarasx, Kasyapaparivarta, and Ugrapariprccha, as well as "a sizable number of additional passages in Mahayana sutra literature, especially in the Maharatnakuta collection.
In the Hindu (2) renunciant traditions, ascetic practices (tapasya) are presented as requisite for perceiving one's true nature as Atman, or individual soul or Self, as well as for facilitating knowledge and realization of the Absolute.
In my own way, something like that, I suppose, is what I occasionally see in the distance following the old ascetic practices.
McGowan examines the relationship between various Greco-Roman foods and economic status, Greco-Roman banquets as well as Jewish meal practices, the use of meat and wine in Greco-Roman sacrificial rites, and the role of food in non-Christian ascetic practices.