Asclepius


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As·cle·pi·us

(ə-sklē′pē-əs)
n. Greek Mythology
A son of Apollo, originally mortal, who became a god of medicine and healing.

[Greek Asklēpios, Asklāpios; perhaps akin to aspalaks, skalops, mole (since healing gods were associated with small mammals, as Apollo with the mouse, and Rudra (the Vedic healing god) with the mole) and of pre-Greek substrate origin.]

Asclepius

(əˈskliːpɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a god of healing; son of Apollo. Roman counterpart: Aesculapius

As•cle•pi•us

(əˈskli pi əs)

n.
the ancient Greek god of medicine and healing, worshiped by the Romans as Aesculapius.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Asclepius - son of ApolloAsclepius - son of Apollo; a hero and the Roman god of medicine and healing; his daughters were Hygeia and Panacea
Translations
Асклепий
Asclepi
Asklépios
Æskulap
ÄskulapAsklepios
Asklepio
Asklepios
Asklepios
Asclépios
אסקלפיוס
Asklepije
Aszklépiosz
Asclepio
アスクレーピオス
AesculapiusAsclepius
Asklepijas
Asclepius
Asklepios
Asklepios
Asclepios
Asklepios
AsklepijEskalup
Асклепије
Asklepios
Asklepios
Асклепій
References in classic literature ?
Well, I said, and to require the help of medicine, not when a wound has to be cured, or on occasion of an epidemic, but just because, by indolence and a habit of life such as we have been describing, men fill themselves with waters and winds, as if their bodies were a marsh, compelling the ingenious sons of Asclepius to find more names for diseases, such as flatulence and catarrh; is not this, too, a disgrace?
Yes, I said, and I do not believe that there were any such diseases in the days of Asclepius; and this I infer from the circumstance that the hero Eurypylus, after he has been wounded in Homer, drinks a posset of Pramnian wine well besprinkled with barley-meal and grated cheese, which are certainly inflammatory, and yet the sons of Asclepius who were at the Trojan war do not blame the damsel who gives him the drink, or rebuke Patroclus, who is treating his case.
Not so extraordinary, I replied, if you bear in mind that in former days, as is commonly said, before the time of Herodicus, the guild of Asclepius did not practise our present system of medicine, which may be said to educate diseases.
Yes, I said; a reward which a man might fairly expect who never understood that, if Asclepius did not instruct his descendants in valetudinarian arts, the omission arose, not from ignorance or inexperience of such a branch of medicine, but because he knew that in all well-ordered states every individual has an occupation to which he must attend, and has therefore no leisure to spend in continually being ill.
And therefore our politic Asclepius may be supposed to have exhibited the power of his art only to persons who, being generally of healthy constitution and habits of life, had a definite ailment; such as these he cured by purges and operations, and bade them live as usual, herein consulting the interests of the State; but bodies which disease had penetrated through and through he would not have attempted to cure by gradual processes of evacuation and infusion: he did not want to lengthen out good-for-nothing lives, or to have weak fathers begetting weaker sons;--if a man was not able to live in the ordinary way he had no business to cure him; for such a cure would have been of no use either to himself, or to the State.
Then, he said, you regard Asclepius as a statesman.
But they would have nothing to do with unhealthy and intemperate subjects, whose lives were of no use either to themselves or others; the art of medicine was not designed for their good, and though they were as rich as Midas, the sons of Asclepius would have declined to attend them.
They were very acute persons, those sons of Asclepius.
Nevertheless, the tragedians and Pindar disobeying our behests, although they acknowledge that Asclepius was the son of Apollo, say also that he was bribed into healing a rich man who was at the point of death, and for this reason he was struck by lightning.
7: This oracle most clearly proves that Asclepius was not the son of Arsinoe, but that Hesiod or one of Hesiod's interpolators composed the verses to please the Messenians.
But Asclepiades says that Arsinoe was the daughter of Leucippus, Perieres' son, and that to her and Apollo Asclepius and a daughter, Eriopis, were born: `And she bare in the palace Asclepius, leader of men, and Eriopis with the lovely hair, being subject in love to Phoebus.
And of Arsinoe likewise: `And Arsinoe was joined with the son of Zeus and Leto and bare a son Asclepius, blameless and strong.