assumption

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as·sump·tion

 (ə-sŭmp′shən)
n.
1. The act of taking to or upon oneself: assumption of an obligation.
2. The act of taking possession or asserting a claim: assumption of command.
3. The act of taking for granted: assumption of a false theory.
4. Something taken for granted or accepted as true without proof; a supposition: a valid assumption.
5. Presumption; arrogance.
6. Logic A minor premise.
7. Assumption Christianity The taking up of the Virgin Mary into heaven in body and soul after her death, observed as a feast on August 15.

[Middle English assumpcion, from Latin assūmptiō, assūmptiōn-, adoption, from assūmptus, past participle of assūmere, to adopt; see assume.]

assumption

(əˈsʌmpʃən)
n
1. the act of taking something for granted or something that is taken for granted
2. an assuming of power or possession of something
3. arrogance; presumption
4. (Logic) logic a statement that is used as the premise of a particular argument but may not be otherwise accepted. Compare axiom4
[C13: from Latin assūmptiō a taking up, from assūmere to assume]
asˈsumptive adj
asˈsumptively adv

Assumption

(əˈsʌmpʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the taking up of the Virgin Mary (body and soul) into heaven when her earthly life was ended
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the feast commemorating this, celebrated by Roman Catholics on Aug 15

as•sump•tion

(əˈsʌmp ʃən)

n.
1. something taken for granted; a supposition.
2. the act of taking for granted or supposing.
3. the act of taking to or upon oneself.
4. the act of taking possession of something: the assumption of power.
5. arrogance; presumption.
6. the taking over of another's debts or obligations.
7.
a. (often cap.) the bodily taking up into heaven of the Virgin Mary following her death.
b. (cap.) a feast commemorating this, celebrated on August 15.
[1250–1300; < Latin assūmptiō <assūm(ere) to take up]

assumption

A supposition on the current situation or a presupposition on the future course of events, either or both assumed to be true in the absence of positive proof, necessary to enable the commander in the process of planning to complete an estimate of the situation and make a decision on the course of action.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assumption - a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn; "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
posit, postulate - (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning
major premise, major premiss - the premise of a syllogism that contains the major term (which is the predicate of the conclusion)
minor premise, minor premiss, subsumption - the premise of a syllogism that contains the minor term (which is the subject of the conclusion)
thesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument
precondition, stipulation, condition - an assumption on which rests the validity or effect of something else
scenario - a postulated sequence of possible events; "planners developed several scenarios in case of an attack"
2.assumption - a hypothesis that is taken for granted; "any society is built upon certain assumptions"
conclusion - an intuitive assumption; "jump to a conclusion"
cornerstone, fundament, groundwork, basis, foundation, base - the fundamental assumptions from which something is begun or developed or calculated or explained; "the whole argument rested on a basis of conjecture"
hypothesis, theory, possibility - a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena; "a scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing becomes a scientific theory"; "he proposed a fresh theory of alkalis that later was accepted in chemical practices"
given, presumption, precondition - an assumption that is taken for granted
basic assumption, constatation, self-evident truth - an assumption that is basic to an argument
3.assumption - the act of taking possession of or power over something; "his assumption of office coincided with the trouble in Cuba"; "the Nazi assumption of power in 1934"; "he acquired all the company's assets for ten million dollars and the assumption of the company's debts"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"
4.assumption - celebration in the Roman Catholic Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life endedAssumption - celebration in the Roman Catholic Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life ended; corresponds to the Dormition in the Eastern Orthodox Church
holy day of obligation - a day when Catholics must attend Mass and refrain from servile work, and Episcopalians must take Communion
Aug, August - the month following July and preceding September
5.assumption - (Christianity) the taking up of the body and soul of the Virgin Mary when her earthly life had endedAssumption - (Christianity) the taking up of the body and soul of the Virgin Mary when her earthly life had ended
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
miracle - a marvellous event manifesting a supernatural act of a divine agent
6.assumption - audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
audaciousness, audacity - aggressive boldness or unmitigated effrontery; "he had the audacity to question my decision"
uppishness, uppityness - assumption of airs beyond one's station
7.assumption - the act of assuming or taking for granted; "your assumption that I would agree was unwarranted"
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
position - the act of positing; an assumption taken as a postulate or axiom

assumption

assumption

noun
Translations
إفْتِراض
předpoklad
antagelseformodningforudsætninghimmelfartoptagelse i himlen
olettamusoletustaivaaseenastuminen
sem ráî er fyrir gert, ætlaîur
przypuszczeniewniebowstąpienie
domneva

assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃən]
A. N
1. (= supposition) → suposición f, supuesto m
on the assumption thatsuponiendo que, poniendo por caso que
we cannot make that assumptionno podemos dar eso por sentado
to start from a false assumptionpartir de una base falsa
2. (= taking) [of power, responsibility] → asunción f
3. the Assumption (Rel) → la Asunción
B. CPD Assumption Day NDía m de la Asunción

Assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃən] n (RELIGION) (also Assumption Day) → l'Assomption f

assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃən] n
(= supposition) → supposition f, hypothèse f
on the assumption that (= on the supposition that) → dans l'hypothèse où (= on condition that) → à condition que
to go on the assumption that ... → présumer que ...
to work on the assumption that ... → présumer que ...
(= taking on) the assumption of responsibility → la prise de responsabilité

assumption

n
Annahme f; (= presupposition)Voraussetzung f; to go on the assumption that …von der Voraussetzung ausgehen, dass …; the basic assumptions of this theory are …diese Theorie geht grundsätzlich davon aus, dass …
(of power, role, office etc)Übernahme f; (forcefully) → Ergreifen nt
(of guise, false name etc)Annahme f; (insincere: of look of innocence etc) → Vortäuschung f, → Aufsetzen nt
(Eccl) the AssumptionMariä Himmelfahrt f

assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃn] n
a. (supposition) → supposizione f, ipotesi f inv
on the assumption that → partendo dal presupposto che
to work on the assumption that → partire dal presupposto che
b. the Assumption (Rel) → l'Assunzione f

assume

(əˈsjuːm) verb
1. to take or accept as true. I assume (that) you'd like time to decide.
2. to take upon oneself or accept (authority, responsibility etc). He assumed the rôle of leader in the emergency.
3. to put on (a particular appearance etc). He assumed a look of horror.
asˈsumed adjective
pretended; not genuine. assumed astonishment; He wrote under an assumed name (= not using his real name).
asˈsumption (-ˈsamp-) noun
something assumed. On the assumption that we can produce four pages an hour, the work will be finished tomorrow.
References in classic literature ?
Excessive amiability and excessive liberality are the two favorite assumptions of the modern generation.
Tyranny has perhaps oftener grown out of the assumptions of power, called for, on pressing exigencies, by a defective constitution, than out of the full exercise of the largest constitutional authorities.
Such an extraordinary assumption of age by a girl of nineteen has never been seen in public before, in the whole course of my theatrical experience.
Francine dropped his arm "And fortune favors your hopes," she added, with an ironical assumption of interest in Mirabel's prospects.
To assume the right to new values--that is the most formidable assumption for a load-bearing and reverent spirit.
I am a little shy of any assumption of moral indignation; there is always in it an element of self-satisfaction which makes it awkward to anyone who has a sense of humour.
It may be assumed--whatever the value of the assumption in connection with what is said to have occurred-- that his mind was occupied with reflections on his domestic infelicities and the distressing changes that they had wrought in his life.
It has been assumed in the foregoing pages that the poems of the Trojan Cycle are later than the Homeric poems; but, as the opposite view has been held, the reasons for this assumption must now be given.
Pestsov, who was standing beside him, was talking to him almost all the time, condemning the music for its excessive affected assumption of simplicity, and comparing it with the simplicity of the Pre-Raphaelites in painting.
Of course she did," I returned, with a fine assumption of scorn,--"of course she did.
Moreover, Speranski, either because he appreciated the other's capacity or because he considered it necessary to win him to his side, showed off his dispassionate calm reasonableness before Prince Andrew and flattered him with that subtle flattery which goes hand in hand with self-assurance and consists in a tacit assumption that one's companion is the only man besides oneself capable of understanding the folly of the rest of mankind and the reasonableness and profundity of one's own ideas.
Charges brought upon the second Thursday after the Feast of the Assumption, in the year of our Lord thirteen hundred and sixty-six, against brother John, formerly known as Hordle John, or John of Hordle, but now a novice in the holy monastic order of the Cistercians.