Asturias

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As·tu·ri·as

 (ə-sto͝or′ē-əs, -styo͝or′-, äs-to͞o′ryäs)
A region and former kingdom of northwest Spain south of the Bay of Biscay. The original Iberian inhabitants were conquered by Rome in the first century bc.

As·tu′ri·an adj. & n.

Asturias

(æˈstʊərɪˌæs)
n
(Placename) a region and former kingdom of NW Spain, consisting of a coastal plain and the Cantabrian Mountains: a Christian stronghold against the Moors (8th to 13th centuries); rich mineral resources

Asturias

(æˈstʊərɪˌæs)
n
(Biography) Miguel Ángel. 1899–1974, Guatemalan novelist and poet. His novels include El Señor Presidente (1946). Nobel prize for literature 1967

As•tu•ri•as

(æˈstʊər i əs, æˈstyʊər-)

n.
1. Miguel Ángel, 1899–1974, Guatemalan writer: Nobel prize 1967.
2. a former kingdom and province in NW Spain.
Translations

Asturias

[æˈstʊərɪæs] NAsturias f
References in classic literature ?
There was besides in the inn, as servant, an Asturian lass with a broad face, flat poll, and snub nose, blind of one eye and not very sound in the other.
The hostess, her daughter, and the worthy Maritornes listened in bewilderment to the words of the knight-errant; for they understood about as much of them as if he had been talking Greek, though they could perceive they were all meant for expressions of good-will and blandishments; and not being accustomed to this kind of language, they stared at him and wondered to themselves, for he seemed to them a man of a different sort from those they were used to, and thanking him in pothouse phrase for his civility they left him, while the Asturian gave her attention to Sancho, who needed it no less than his master.
While he was taken up with these vagaries, then, the time and the hour- an unlucky one for him- arrived for the Asturian to come, who in her smock, with bare feet and her hair gathered into a fustian coif, with noiseless and cautious steps entered the chamber where the three were quartered, in quest of the carrier; but scarcely had she gained the door when Don Quixote perceived her, and sitting up in his bed in spite of his plasters and the pain of his ribs, he stretched out his arms to receive his beauteous damsel.
The worthy carrier, whose unholy thoughts kept him awake, was aware of his doxy the moment she entered the door, and was listening attentively to all Don Quixote said; and jealous that the Asturian should have broken her word with him for another, drew nearer to Don Quixote's bed and stood still to see what would come of this talk which he could not understand; but when he perceived the wench struggling to get free and Don Quixote striving to hold her, not relishing the joke he raised his arm and delivered such a terrible cuff on the lank jaws of the amorous knight that be bathed all his mouth in blood, and not content with this he mounted on his ribs and with his feet tramped all over them at a pace rather smarter than a trot.
Day-to-day events identify them as being Asturians, Galicians, Catalans, or Basques, Andalusians or from Castilla-La Mancha, although in the official records, and abroad, they appear as Spanish.
The nomadic nature of the Asturians in these two stories calls to mind a particular notion of space described by Deleuze and Guattari in A Thousand Plateus.
The Asturians pushed north-coast rivals Racing Santander down to 20th on goal difference after Hector Cuper's winless side suffered a 1-0 home defeat to Espanyol.
Valencia could have gone top if they had beaten Sporting Gijon in the late match at the Mestalla but remain third after goals from Luis Moran, David Barral and Diego Castro gave the Asturians a 3-2 win.