Athabaskan


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Ath·a·bas·kan

or Ath·a·bas·can  (ăth′ə-băs′kən) also Ath·a·pas·can (-păs′-)
n.
1. A group of related North American Indian languages including the Apachean languages and languages of Alaska, northwest Canada, and coastal Oregon and California.
2. A member of an Athabaskan-speaking people.

[After Lake Athabasca from Cree athapaskaaw, there is scattered grass.]

Ath′a·bas′kan adj.

Ath•a•bas•kan

or Ath•a•bas•can

(ˌæθ əˈbæs kən)

also Athapaskan



n.
1. a family of American Indian languages spoken or formerly spoken in inland Alaska and NW Canada, and by peoples of W Oregon and NW California, as the Hupa, and the U.S. Southwest, as the Apache and Navajo.
2. a member of an Athabaskan-speaking people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Athabaskan - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Athapaskan language and living in the subarctic regions of western Canada and central Alaska
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Apache - any member of Athapaskan tribes that migrated to the southwestern desert (from Arizona to Texas and south into Mexico); fought a losing battle from 1861 to 1886 with the United States and were resettled in Oklahoma
Chipewyan - a member of the Athapaskan people living in western Canada between Great Slave Lake and Hudson Bay
Hupa - a member of the Athapaskan people of the Trinity River valley in California
Mattole - a member of the Athapaskan people living in northwestern California
Navaho, Navajo - a member of an Athapaskan people that migrated to Arizona and New Mexico and Utah
2.Athabaskan - a group of Amerindian languages (the name coined by an American anthropologist, Edward Sapir)
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Apache - the language of the Apache
Navaho, Navajo - the Athapaskan language spoken by the Navaho
Hupa - the Athapaskan language spoken by the Hupa
Mattole - the Athapaskan language spoken by the Mattole
Chippewaian, Chippewyan, Chipewyan - the language spoken by the Chipewyan
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract Awarded for Disposal of the Royal Canadian Navys (RCN) former Iroquois-class destroyer, HMCS Athabaskan.
Jack Mahoney, a navy photographer, perished with the sinking of the FIMCS Athabaskan.
Like the Navajo, they are linguistically related to the Northern Athabaskan peoples of western Canada, eastern Alaska and the Pacific Northwest.
In 2000, he was appointed Executive Officer in HMCS ATHABASKAN.
Prospectors, once landed at Knik, purchased goods and services, all of which would also have to be shipped to Knik or procured from the local Dena'ina or other Athabaskan tribes trading at Knik.
On a trip to Bear Creek Weir, where salmon are rumoured to be running and bald eagles glare from treetops, I meet Nicholas, a 14-year-old native Athabaskan who prefers to steer clear of outsiders.
On a trip to Bear Creek Weir, where salmon are rumoured to be running and bald eagles glare from treetops, I meet Nicholas, a 14-yearold native Athabaskan who prefers to steer clear of outsiders.
The only other outside-NWT council that is part of the Dene Nation is the Arctic Athabaskan Council, headquartered in Whitehorse.
In the Arctic, this usually means Indigenous/Native/Aboriginal/ and numerically small people vs all others, and within the former group, further subdivisions such as Inuit, Dene/ Athabaskan, Sami, Aleut, Chukchi, and Nenets.
Like a colossal molar on the jaw of the Alaska range, the peak holds a cultural gravitas for the Alaskan Koyukon Athabaskan people, who came to call it Deenaalee or "the high one' and continued to do so even after it was changed to McKinley in 1917.
The oil sands economy has offered training and employment to Indigenous communities in the area, but it has also had environmental and health impacts on the Athabaskan and Chipewyan people.
What's not quite so comfortably in Parnell's camp are the Inupiaq and Athabaskan tribes in the path of his destruction.