attic


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At·tic

 (ăt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of ancient Attica, Athens, or the Athenians.
2. Characterized by purity, simplicity, and elegant wit: Attic prose.
n.
The ancient Greek dialect of Attica, in which the bulk of classical Greek literature is written.

[Latin Atticus, from Greek Attikos, from Attikē, Attica.]

at·tic

 (ăt′ĭk)
n.
1. A story or room directly below the roof of a building, especially a house.
2. A low wall or story above the cornice of a classical façade.

[From Attic story, story of a building enclosed by one decorative structure placed above another, much taller decorative structure, usually involving the Attic order, an architectural order having square columns of any of the basic five orders, from French attique, from attique, Attic, from Latin Atticus; see Attic.]

attic

(ˈætɪk)
n
1. a space or room within the roof of a house
2. (Architecture) architect a storey or low wall above the cornice of a classical façade
[C18: special use of Attic from the use of Attic-style pilasters to adorn the façade of the top storey]

Attic

(ˈætɪk)
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
2. (Placename) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
3. (Languages) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
4. (Historical Terms) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
5. (often not capital) classically elegant, simple, or pure: an Attic style.
n
(Languages) the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Athens: the chief literary dialect of classical Greek. See also Aeolic, Arcadic, Doric, Ionic

At•tic

(ˈæt ɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Attica or to the ancient city-state of Athens, coterminous with Attica in the 6th and 5th centuries b.c.
2. (sometimes l.c.) displaying simple elegance, incisive intelligence, or delicate wit.
n.
3. the dialect of ancient Greek spoken in Attica, which became the basis for the Koine.
[1555–65]

at•tic

(ˈæt ɪk)

n.
1. the part of a building, esp. of a house, directly under a roof; garret.
2. a room or rooms in an attic.
3. a low story or decorative wall above an entablature or the main cornice of a building.
[1690–1700; special use of Attic]

Attic

 a collection of Greeks—N. Y. Times, 1983.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Attic - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roofattic - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof; often used for storage
cockloft - a small loft or garret
storey, floor, story, level - a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
hayloft, mow, haymow - a loft in a barn where hay is stored
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
2.Attic - the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Attica and Athens and IoniaAttic - the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Attica and Athens and Ionia
Ancient Greek - the Greek language prior to the Roman Empire
3.Attic - informal terms for a human headattic - informal terms for a human head  
human head - the head of a human being
4.attic - (architecture) a low wall at the top of the entablature; hides the roof
entablature - (architecture) the structure consisting of the part of a classical temple above the columns between a capital and the roof
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
Adj.1.Attic - of or relating to Attica or its inhabitants or to the dialect spoken in Athens in classical timesAttic - of or relating to Attica or its inhabitants or to the dialect spoken in Athens in classical times; "Attic Greek"

attic

noun loft, garret, roof space Gallons of water cascaded from the attic.
Translations
půdapodkrovní světnice
loftkvistkvistværelse
ullakkovintti
tavan
padlás
rishæî, háaloft
屋根裏
다락방
palėpė
bēniņi
manzardka
podstrešje
vind
ห้องใต้หลังคา
gác mái

attic

[ˈætɪk]
A. Ndesván m, altillo m (LAm), entretecho m (LAm)
B. CPD attic room Ndesván m, altillo m (LAm), entretecho m (LAm)

attic

[ˈætɪk] ngrenier m

Attic

adjattisch

attic

nDachboden m, → Speicher m; (lived-in) → Mansarde f; attic roomDachkammer f, → Mansarden- or Dachzimmer nt; in the atticauf dem (Dach)boden or Speicher

Attic

[ˈætɪk] adjattico/a

attic

[ˈætɪk] nsoffitta, solaio; (room) → mansarda

attic

(ˈӕtik) noun
a room at the top of a house under the roof. They store old furniture in the attic.

Attic

غُرْفَةٌ تـَحْتَ سَقْفِ البَيْت půda loft Dachboden σοφίτα ático, desván ullakko grenier tavan attico 屋根裏 다락방 zolder loft strych sótão мансарда vind ห้องใต้หลังคา tavan arası gác mái 阁楼
References in classic literature ?
You start in the attic and work your way down to the first floor.
They both heard a curious roly-poly noise under the attic floor.
Before this remonstrance was finished, Maggie was already out of hearing, making her way toward the great attic that run under the old high-pitched roof, shaking the water from her black locks as she ran, like a Skye terrier escaped from his bath.
From Theseus Oedipus craves protection in life and burial in Attic soil; the benefits that will accrue shall be told later.
I could only see that it was an attic, with a sloping roof; and a faint glimmer, no more than a less profound obscurity, came from a skylight.
And at last he hired, just opposite Rosa's window, a little attic, distant enough not to allow him to be recognized with the naked eye, but sufficiently near to enable him, with the help of his telescope, to watch everything that was going on at the Loewestein in Rosa's room, just as at Dort he had watched the dry-room of Cornelius.
When you've finished your morning work, Nancy," Miss Polly was saying now, "you may clear the little room at the head of the stairs in the attic, and make up the cot bed.
I left the breakfast-table, and as I ascended the stair I met him coming down with an old rusty key, which must have belonged to the attic, in one hand, and a small brass box, like a cashbox, in the other.
The little white attic, which had continued her sleeping-room ever since her first entering the family, proving incompetent to suggest any reply, she had recourse, as soon as she was dressed, to another apartment more spacious and more meet for walking about in and thinking, and of which she had now for some time been almost equally mistress.
I think Daddy Jacques did wrong to leave behind him the weapon with which the crime was committed and, as he occupied the attic immediately above Mademoiselle Stangerson's room, the builder's job ordered by the examining magistrate will give us the key of the enigma and it will not be long before we learn by what natural trap, or by what secret door, the old fellow was able to slip in and out, and return immediately to the laboratory to Monsieur Stangerson, without his absence being noticed.
The attic was also unfinished--the family had been figuring that in case of an emergency they could rent this attic, but they found that there was not even a floor, nothing but joists, and beneath them the lath and plaster of the ceiling below.
The entrance to the attic above his apartments was walled up.