attribution theory


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attribution theory

n
(Psychology) psychol the theory that tries to explain how people link actions and emotions to particular causes, both internal and external
References in periodicals archive ?
Granted, the authors' explicit purpose was to not review theories, but unless readers are familiar with Attribution Theory, this section would be difficult to understand.
Hewstone (Eds), Attribution Theory and Research: Conceptual, Developmental, and Social Dimensions.
We selected three consumer attitudes from the pricing literature that are motivated by assimilation contrast theory (deal believability, source credibility, and attitude toward the deal), and two consumer attitudes suggested in the sales promotion literature that are motivated by attribution theory (brand image and perceived quality).
Despite attempts first by its author to subsume it under dissonance theory, and later by others to subsume it under attribution theory, it remains a worthwhile (and fitfully lively) object of study in its own right.
of California, Los Angeles) proposes an attribution theory of interpersonal or social motivation that distinguishes between the role of thinking and feeling in determining action.
Motivation research includes several theories such as behavioral theory, self-determination theory, expectancy-value theory, and attribution theory (Eccles and Wigfield, 2002).
Attribution theory, a favorite of Spilka, is liberally represented.
Culpeper sees the two as complementary (within some limitations) and then argues that "in a number of respects foregrounding theory [in stylistics and literary theory] is analogous to attribution theory, and that by investigating this analogy one can gain a better understanding of the relationship between the two [attribution] models" (129).
Founded by Fritz Heider (1944) and further developed by Bernard Weiner (1985), attribution theory has become a focus of psychology (e.
An explanation for the above arguments can be made from a theoretical perspective by expanding upon and integrating both equity theory and attribution theory.
Portions of this paper were presented at the Industrial Relations Research Association Meetings, January 3-5, 1994, Boston, MA, and at the Florida State Symposium on Attribution Theory, June 3-4, 1994, Tallahassee, FL.