attribution theory


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attribution theory

n
(Psychology) psychol the theory that tries to explain how people link actions and emotions to particular causes, both internal and external
References in periodicals archive ?
Using attribution theory (Weiner, 1986, 1995, 2006), this study examines how specific cognitive and emotional responses to perceived workplace wrongdoing lead to whistle-blowing decisions.
Supervisors can influence employees performing below standard by using one technique called attribution theory and another called the performance-formula.
These findings were consistent with predictions that were based on attribution theory.
They are self-determination theory, the agentic perspective, goal setting theory, and attribution theory.
Attribution theory has been perhaps the theory most frequently used to explain or explore the third-person effect (Gunther, 1991).
Attribution theory (Weiner, 1985) suggests that people differ in the degree to which they believe they have personal control over the positive and negative events in their lives.
The application of Weiner's (1986) attribution theory to the career decision-making domain has led to the following propositions: Someone who believes that career decision making is susceptible to internal, dynamic, and controllable forces is likely to believe that career-related events and decisions are the result of internal factors within her or his control that can be changed with varying degrees of effort (i.
especially in typically "male" fields, have employed Bernard Weiner's Attribution Theory (1974, 1994), which explains motivation
Attribution theory and the overjustification hypothesis (Lepper, Greene, & Nisbett, 1973) provide still another explanation.
Attribution theory concerns how people use information to make causal inferences.
Attribution theory and research: Conceptual, developmental and social dimensions (pp.