audience

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au·di·ence

 (ô′dē-əns)
n.
1.
a. A group of viewers or listeners, especially those present at a performance (as a play, concert, or lecture) or a public event (as a rally).
b. The readership for printed matter, as for a book.
c. A group of people who follow or admire an artist or performer: The tenor expanded his audience by recording popular songs as well as opera.
2. A formal hearing, as with a religious or state dignitary.
3. An opportunity to be heard or to express one's views.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin audientia, from audiēns, audient-, present participle of audīre, to hear; see au- in Indo-European roots.]

audience

(ˈɔːdɪəns)
n
1. a group of spectators or listeners, esp at a public event such as a concert or play
2. the people reached by a book, film, or radio or television programme
3. the devotees or followers of a public entertainer, lecturer, etc; regular public
4. an opportunity to put one's point of view, such as a formal interview with a monarch or head of state
[C14: from Old French, from Latin audientia a hearing, from audīre to hear]

au•di•ence

(ˈɔ di əns)

n.
1. the group of spectators at a public event; listeners or viewers collectively, as in attendance at a play or concert.
2. the persons reached by a book, radio or television broadcast, etc.; public.
3. a regular public that manifests interest, support, enthusiasm, or the like; following.
4. opportunity to be heard; chance to speak; a hearing.
5. a formal interview with a sovereign or other high-ranking person: an audience with the pope.
6. the act of hearing, or attending to, words or sounds.
[1325–75; Middle English < Middle French < Latin audientia act of listening, group of listeners = audient-, s. of audiēns, present participle of audīre to hear + -ia -ia]
usage: See collective noun.

Audience

 a group or assembly of listeners, viewers, or spectators; a formal interview with a person of importance, hence, those present at such an interview.
Examples: an audience with the pope; an audience of readers; of secular men, 1407.

audience

You refer to all the people who are watching or listening to a play, concert, film, or television play as the audience. You can use either a singular or plural form of a verb with audience.

Yesterday the audience was rather larger.
The television audience were able to hear some of the comments.

You can also use audience to refer to the people who read a particular writer's books or hear about someone's ideas.

...the need for intellectuals to communicate their ideas to a wider audience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.audience - a gathering of spectators or listeners at a (usually public) performanceaudience - a gathering of spectators or listeners at a (usually public) performance; "the audience applauded"; "someone in the audience began to cough"
assemblage, gathering - a group of persons together in one place
gallery - spectators at a golf or tennis match
grandstand - the audience at a stadium or racetrack
house - the audience gathered together in a theatre or cinema; "the house applauded"; "he counted the house"
attender, auditor, hearer, listener - someone who listens attentively
motion-picture fan, moviegoer - someone who goes to see movies
playgoer, theatergoer, theatregoer - someone who attends the theater
2.audience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainmentaudience - the part of the general public interested in a source of information or entertainment; "every artist needs an audience"; "the broadcast reached an audience of millions"
populace, public, world - people in general considered as a whole; "he is a hero in the eyes of the public"
hoi polloi, masses, the great unwashed, multitude, people, mass - the common people generally; "separate the warriors from the mass"; "power to the people"
readership - the audience reached by written communications (books or magazines or newspapers etc.)
TV audience, viewers, viewing audience - the audience reached by television
3.audience - an opportunity to state your case and be heardaudience - an opportunity to state your case and be heard; "they condemned him without a hearing"; "he saw that he had lost his audience"
chance, opportunity - a possibility due to a favorable combination of circumstances; "the holiday gave us the opportunity to visit Washington"; "now is your chance"
4.audience - a conference (usually with someone important)audience - a conference (usually with someone important); "he had a consultation with the judge"; "he requested an audience with the king"
group discussion, conference - a discussion among participants who have an agreed (serious) topic

audience

noun
2. public, market, following, fans, devotees, fanbase, aficionados She began to find a receptive audience for her work.
3. interview, meeting, hearing, exchange, reception, consultation The Prime Minister will seek an audience with the Queen today.

audience

noun
1. The body of persons who admire a public personality, especially an entertainer:
2. A chance to be heard:
Translations
جُمْهُورجُمهور المُشاهِدين أو المُسْتَمِعينمُقابَلَه رَسْمِيَّه
publikumaudienceobecenstvo
publikumtilhørereaudiens
yleisökatsojalukijalukijakunta
publika
közönséghallgatóságkihallgatás
áheyrendur, áhorfendur, lesenduráheyrn, viîtal
聴衆
관중청중
audiencijaklausytojaižiūrovai
audienceauditorijaklausītājipieņemšana
publiekgevolglezerslezerspubliek
audienciapublikum
občinstvo
publik
ผู้ชม
dinleyicilerhuzura kabulresmî kabulseyirci- dinleyiciseyirciler
khán giả

audience

[ˈɔːdɪəns]
A. N
1. (= gathering) → público m; (in theatre etc) → público m, auditorio m
there was a big audienceasistió un gran público
those in the audiencelos que formaban/forman parte del público or de la audiencia
TV audiencestelespectadores mpl
2. (= interview) → audiencia f (with con) to have an audience withtener audiencia con, ser recibido en audiencia por
to grant sb an audiencedar audiencia or conceder (una) audiencia a algn
to receive sb in audiencerecibir a algn en audiencia
B. CPD audience appeal N it's got audience appealtiene gancho con el público
audience chamber Nsala f de audiencias
audience participation Nparticipación f del público
audience rating N (TV, Rad) → índice m de audiencia
audience research N (TV, Rad) → sondeo m de opiniones

audience

[ˈɔːdiəns] n
(in theatre, cinema)public m
The entire audience broke into loud applause → L'ensemble du public se mit à applaudir à tout rompre.
[radio programme] the audience [radio programme] → l'audience f, les auditeurs/trices; [TV programme] → les téléspectateurs/trices, l'audience f
a worldwide television audience of six million → six millions de téléspectateurs dans le monde entier
(= interview) → audience faudience participation nparticipation f du public

audience

n
Publikum nt no pl; (Theat, TV) → Zuschauer pl, → Publikum nt no pl; (of speaker)Zuhörer pl, → Publikum nt no pl; (of writer, book)Leserkreis m, → Leserschaft f; (Rad) → Zuhörerschaft f; to have a large audienceein großes Publikum haben or ansprechen (also Rad, TV etc); to have audience appealpublikumswirksam sein; I prefer London audiencesich ziehe das Publikum in London vor
(= formal interview)Audienz f(with bei)

audience

[ˈɔːdɪəns] n
a. (gathering) → pubblico (Radio) → ascoltatori mpl (TV) → telespettatori mpl; (of speaker) → uditorio
there was a big audience at the theatre → c'erano molti spettatori or c'era un gran pubblico al teatro
b. (formal interview) → udienza

audience

(ˈoːdiəns) noun
1. a group of people watching or listening to a performance etc. The audience at the concert; a television audience.
2. a formal interview with someone important eg a king. an audience with the Pope.

audience ends in -ence (not -ance).

audience

جُمْهُور publikum publikum Publikum ακροατήριο audiencia yleisö public publika pubblico 聴衆 청중 publiek publikum publiczność audiência аудитория publik ผู้ชม seyirci- dinleyici khán giả 受众
References in classic literature ?
And so much did his prayer always work on the devotional feelings of his audiences, that there seemed often a danger that it would be lost altogether in the abundance of the responses which broke out everywhere around him.
The result of this system is, that lecture-courses upon specialties of an unusual nature are often delivered to very slim audiences, while those upon more practical and every-day matters of education are delivered to very large ones.
At the college there had been good fellowship, fun, rules, and duties which were a source of strength when observed and a source of delicious excitement when violated, freedom from ceremony, toffee making, flights on the banisters, and appreciative audiences for the soldier in the chimney.
This conversation was not ended under five audiences, each of several hours; and the king heard the whole with great attention, frequently taking notes of what I spoke, as well as memorandums of what questions he intended to ask me.
He urged the sultan to remove with the prince to a lovely little island close by, whence he could easily attend public audiences, and where the charming scenery and fine air would do the invalid so much good as to enable him to bear his father's occasional absence.
So while Bell, in eloquent rhapsodies, painted word- pictures of a universal telephone service to applauding audiences, Sanders and Hubbard were leasing telephones two by two, to business men who previously had been using the private lines of the Western Union Telegraph Company.
In his political capacity he has authority to settle disputes between the provinces, when other methods fail; to assist at the deliberations of the States-General, and at their particular conferences; to give audiences to foreign ambassadors, and to keep agents for his particular affairs at foreign courts.
The difficulty was solved by supposing that the narrator had made a mistake of one day in the date of the occurrence; so that our friend did not hesitate to introduce the story at every tavern and country store along the road, expending a whole bunch of Spanish wrappers among at least twenty horrified audiences.
In both of these theatres there have been individual artists, who have succeeded in creating in their audiences - and every theatre in London has its own audience - the temperament to which Art appeals.
This result was the making of his fortune; ever afterwards he was in the habit of giving very profitable audiences to all curious travellers who were desirous of beholding the man who had eaten the great navigator's great toe.
Age had not weakened her tongue or her memory, and from a discreetly barred upper window, in the hearing of not less than a dozen servants, she paid Kim compliments that would have flung European audiences into unclean dismay.
It was that old glory that opened the series of companions of those morning rides; a series which extended through three successive Parisian spring-times and comprised a famous physiologist, a fellow who seemed to hint that mankind could be made immortal or at least everlastingly old; a fashionable philosopher and psychologist who used to lecture to enormous audiences of women with his tongue in his cheek (but never permitted himself anything of the kind when talking to Rita); that surly dandy Cabanel (but he only once, from mere vanity), and everybody else at all distinguished including also a celebrated person who turned out later to be a swindler.