aulos

(redirected from Auloi)

aulos

(ˈɔːlɒs; ˈaʊlɒs)
n
an ancient Greek woodwind instrument with a double reed, similar to an oboe
References in periodicals archive ?
Como si de un nexo entre espacios miticos se tratara (Grau, Olmos y Perea 2008: 28-29), la auletris a la que nos referimos conecta este vaso con la iconografia de la terracota que aparecio en este mismo departamento, la llamada "placa de la divinidad nutricia", en la que se representa una escena dominada por un gran personaje femenino que sostiene en sus brazos a sendos infantes que maman de sus pechos; a su derecha, una mujer de tamano mucho menor se aproxima, posando su mano derecha sobre el hombro de un nino en gesto protector mientras extiende el brazo izquierdo para tocar reverencialmente el manto de la divinidad nutricia; a la izquierda de la diosa, una mujer y un nino acompanan la escena haciendo sonar sus respectivos auloi (Grau, Olmos y Perea 2008: 18-21).
The auloi could induce a viewer to interpret the woman as the slave performer.
In fact, the joke for the piper does not depend on typical or standard behavior, but on the visual similarity between fellatio and playing auloi.
1 (4)) quoted by Athenaeus 337e, while the verses of Archilochus contain auloi (93a) and an aulos player (58.
One who plays auloi is called an aulos-player and, according to Archilochus, a 'horn blower'"
thunder, and the noises of winds and hail and axles and pulleys, and the voices of salpinges and auloi and syringes and instruments of every kind, and even the sounds of dogs and sheep and birds and his diction (lexis) will consist entirely of imitations by voice and gesture, or will include just a smattering of narration .
This sample, taken together with several other small fragments from other sites, indicates that bronze-covered auloi were quite popular in ancient Israel/Palestine.
76 attributes the use of auloi made from horns to the Etruscans).
The instruments in question are those known as `Phrygian' auloi, or [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; they were used especially in the rites of the Mother Goddess and are depicted on a number of sculptures of the Roman imperial period.
Another example is West's treatment of paired auloi, in which he notes the occurrence of paired pipes in musical performance in the Balkans and some Islamic countries.
In this regard, I find it noteworthy that West has been able to provide detailed commentary on several topics, for example, his treatment of extant auloi in corroboration with literary accounts and the limited degree to which such information may shed light on ancient scales.
There is no proof that these are not still harps, but I can recall no evidence for harps in cult use, or in combination with auloi, whereas lyres can certainly be documented in both connections.