Aum


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Aum

 (ōm)
n. Hinduism & Buddhism
Variant of Om.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aum - a terrorist organization whose goal is to take over Japan and then the world; based on a religion founded in 1987 that combines elements of Buddhism with Christianity; "in 1995 Aum members released deadly sarin gas on a Tokyo subway train"
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
Nihon, Nippon, Japan - a constitutional monarchy occupying the Japanese Archipelago; a world leader in electronics and automobile manufacture and ship building
References in periodicals archive ?
Advisers who favor the AUM method may contrast it with the traditional way of paying commissions on trades.
The increase was driven by favorable market returns, an increase in money market AUM, and inflows in PowerShares QQQ's; partially offset by negative foreign exchange and modest net long-term outflows.
While AUM fee compensation in an independent advisory firm eliminates many of the conflicts inherent in commission sales (churning, heavily loaded products, etc.
Yet AUM fees are far more relevant for some of these services--like portfolio-related alpha--than others.
The three death row inmates are Yoshihiro Inoue, 43, Tomomasa Nakagawa, 50, and Yasuo Hayashi, 55, all former senior AUM members.
AUM Shinrikyo, known for its sarin nerve gas attacks in the Tokyo subway in 1995 and in Matsumoto, Nagano Prefecture in 1994, renamed itself Aleph in 2000.
And this is why the yogis say that ultimately, the true sound of Aum is heard in deep meditation.
At the time of the Aum Affair, Japan was in search of a new destiny but the existing social system failed to provide a viable answer.
On investigation, officials found that the odors originated from the eight-story headquarters building of the religious group Aum Shinrikyo.
Shortly after the subway attacks, Mori was the only member of the press who requested permission from Aum to film a documentary about the everyday activities of its members.
Niimi, 38, the former AUM ''home affairs minister,'' was found guilty in a total of 11 criminal cases and was handed the death sentence, as sought by the prosecution.
It is written by a scholar of Japanese religions with extensive experience in Japan and draws on the best scholarly literature on Aum Shinrikyo.