Aum Shinrikyo

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Aum Shinrikyo

(ˈəʊm ˌʃɪnrɪˈkjəʊ)
n
(Other Non-Christian Religions) a syncretistic Japanese cult combining elements of Buddhism, Hinduism, and Christianity, founded by Shoko Asahara in 1986; responsible for a number of murders and in particular a nerve-gas attack on the Tokyo underground in 1995. Also called: Supreme Truth Cult
[C20: from Sanskrit aum om + Japanese shinri kyo supreme truth]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Aum Shinrikyo - a terrorist organization whose goal is to take over Japan and then the world; based on a religion founded in 1987 that combines elements of Buddhism with Christianity; "in 1995 Aum members released deadly sarin gas on a Tokyo subway train"
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
Nihon, Nippon, Japan - a constitutional monarchy occupying the Japanese Archipelago; a world leader in electronics and automobile manufacture and ship building
References in periodicals archive ?
LDP's Ishihara links Fukushima plant with Aum cult building
FUGITIVE J CCTV footage shows Takahashi at a bank ON DEATH ROW 3 Aum cult leader Shoko Asahara HORROR J Victims of gas attack in 1995 ARRESTED 3 Takahashi is led away by Tokyo police
The police launched a huge manhunt to catch Takahashi after the arrest on June third of Naoko Kikuchi, 40, who was also a former member of Aum cult and suspected of being involved in the subway attack.
The Aum cult was also responsible for an attack on the city of Matsumoto in central Japan a year earlier, when sarin -- which Saddam Hussein deployed against the Kurds in northern Iraq in 1988 -- killed eight people.
By its manifestations, the Aum cult turned upside down and reversed (1) the perspective of the inside (uchi) and the outside (soto), the foundation of the Japanese society, which separates the self (my family, my house, my company, my country) from the other (the other's family, the other's house, the other's company, the other's country), revealing the close connection (heisasei) between the self and the surrounding environment, as well as the regressiveness (taikosei) characterizing them.
Top court nixes appeal by former key AUM cult member Nakamura
Ogata, playing a member of the former Aum cult, stands on the almost empty stage and mutters: "I am getting confused whether I really think this way, or I am forced to think this way.