aurora


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Au·ro·ra 1

 (ə-rôr′ə)
n. Roman Mythology
The goddess of the dawn.

[Latin Aurōra; see aurora.]

Au·ro·ra 2

 (ə-rôr′ə)
1. A city of north-central Colorado, a residential suburb of Denver.
2. A city of northeast Illinois on the Fox River west of Chicago. It developed as an industrial center.

au·ro·ra

 (ə-rôr′ə)
n. pl. au·ro·ras or au·ro·rae (ə-rôr′ē)
1. A luminous atmospheric phenomenon appearing as streamers or bands of light sometimes visible in the night sky in northern or southern regions of the earth. It is thought to be caused by charged particles from the sun entering the earth's magnetic field and stimulating molecules in the atmosphere.
2. The dawn.

[Middle English, dawn, from Latin aurōra; see aus- in Indo-European roots.]

au·ro′ral, au·ro′re·an (-ē-ən) adj.
au·ro′ral·ly adv.

aurora

(ɔːˈrɔːrə)
n, pl -ras or -rae (-riː)
1. (Physical Geography) an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands, curtains, or streamers of light, usually green, red, or yellow, that move across the sky in polar regions. It is caused by collisions between air molecules and charged particles from the sun that are trapped in the earth's magnetic field
2. poetic the dawn
[C14: from Latin: dawn; see east]
auˈroral adj
auˈrorally adv

Aurora

(ɔːˈrɔːrə)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) the Roman goddess of the dawn. Greek counterpart: Eos
2. the dawn or rise of something

Aurora

(ɔːˈrɔːrə)
n
(Placename) another name for Maewo

Au•ro•ra

(əˈrɔr ə, əˈroʊr ə)

n., pl. au•ro•ras, au•ro•rae (əˈrɔr i, əˈroʊr i)
1. the Roman goddess of the dawn.
2. (l.c.) dawn.
3. (l.c.) a radiant emission from the upper atmosphere that occurs as luminous streamers, bands, etc., caused when air molecules are excited by charged particles from the solar wind.
4. a city in central Colorado, near Denver. 252,341.
5. a city in NE Illinois. 116,405.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: dawn, east]
au•ro′ral, au•ro′re•an, adj.

au·ro·ra

(ə-rôr′ə)
Plural auroras or aurorae (ə-rôr′ē)
A brilliant display of bands of light in the sky at night, especially in polar regions. The light is caused by charged particles from the sun that are drawn into the atmosphere by the Earth's magnetic field.

aurora

1. An electrical discharge producing curtains of light seen at high latitudes in the night sky.
2. The orthern and southern “polar lights” sometimes seen in Earth’s upper atmosphere and created by solar particles striking atoms.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aurora - the first light of dayaurora - the first light of day; "we got up before dawn"; "they talked until morning"
time of day, hour - clock time; "the hour is getting late"
2.aurora - an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth's magnetic lines of forceaurora - an atmospheric phenomenon consisting of bands of light caused by charged solar particles following the earth's magnetic lines of force
atmospheric phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the atmosphere
aurora australis, southern lights - the aurora of the southern hemisphere
aurora borealis, northern lights - the aurora of the northern hemisphere
streamer - light that streams; "streamers of flames"
3.Aurora - (Roman mythology) goddess of the dawn; counterpart of Greek Eos
Roman mythology - the mythology of the ancient Romans

aurora

noun
The first appearance of daylight in the morning:
References in classic literature ?
The Aurora was the first steamboat of the year for the Outside, and her decks were jammed with prosperous adventurers and broken gold seekers, all equally as mad to get to the Outside as they had been originally to get to the Inside.
Any overheated motor may of course "seize" without warning; but so many complaints have reached us of accidents similar to yours while shooting the Aurora that we are inclined to believe with Lavalle that the upper strata of the Aurora Borealis are practically one big electric "leak," and that the paralysis of your engines was due to complete magnetization of all metallic parts.
They both spoke to the dingy dresser by name, calling him Parkinson, and asking for the lady as Miss Aurora Rome.
I am going down the river; and if I should see anything of the Aurora I shall let him know that you are uneasy.
The Rue des Lombards had its share of the caresses of Aurora with the rosy fingers, and D'Artagnan arose like Aurora.
The stars leaped and danced in the frosty air, and overhead the colored bars of the aurora borealis were shooting like great searchlights.
Roque went back, while Don Quixote remained on horseback, just as he was, waiting for day, and it was not long before the countenance of the fair Aurora began to show itself at the balconies of the east, gladdening the grass and flowers, if not the ear, though to gladden that too there came at the same moment a sound of clarions and drums, and a din of bells, and a tramp, tramp, and cries of "Clear the way there
Duck is an old man living in Aurora, Illinois, where he is universally respected.
There then came a whole regiment of snow-flakes, but they did not fall from above, and they were quite bright and shining from the Aurora Borealis.
Towards midnight the sea suddenly resumed its usual colour; but behind us, even to the limits of the horizon, the sky reflected the whitened waves, and for a long time seemed impregnated with the vague glimmerings of an aurora borealis.
It was the aurora borealis of the frozen pole exiled to a summer land!
Under more elevated latitudes, it might have been mistaken for an immense aurora borealis, for the sky appeared on fire.