Australianism


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Australianism

(ɒˈstreɪlɪəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. the Australian national character or spirit
2. loyalty to Australia, its political independence, culture, etc
3. a linguistic usage, custom, or other feature peculiar to or characteristic of Australia, its people, or their culture

Aus•tral•ian•ism

(ɔˈstreɪl yəˌnɪz əm)
n.
a language feature characteristic of or peculiar to Australian English.
[1890–1900]
References in periodicals archive ?
WALT: In the armed services mateship was a peculiar Australianism.
The research findings have shown that Macca's is Australia's favourite brand nickname and that half of the population use the iconic Australianism," said McDonald's Australia's chief marketing officer Mark Lollback.
Woods described Labor's platform with a view to luring such supporters: 'Embodied in its various planks would be found the noblest aims and highest ideals of true Australianism .
For example, Atherton speaks of the meaning behind the words of the pseudonym: Geyer, pronounced guy-er, is the Americanism for a man and an Australianism for a joke and thus links the pseudonyms of Lehmann and Geyer, through the Bulletin hoax.
Look," he says, using the Australianism that prefixes nearly every sentence uttered by, just for example, Shane Warne, "Bart Cummings has won more Group 1s than I have and 11 Melbourne Cups.
A Sydney-based and highly influential magazine that remained at the forefront of Australian life from 1880-1961, the Bulletin baldly promoted egalitarianism, unionism, and Australianism.
Howard's strategy was to claim a return to the stability or simplicity of the 1950s, offering the dream of revived suburban security in the face of heightening insecurity both globally and domestically, and to insert the appeal of One Nation into his own project, with monoculturalism, a kind of revived old Australianism, replacing the more strident anti-Asian racism of One Nation.
Furphy" (a rumour) was also an Australianism coined during the Great War, and reflected the cynicism of the Australian troops with the information they received about the fighting in which they participated.
The Australianism of the poetry lies more in the depiction of landscapes with appropriate vocabulary than in particularly Australian language or revelation of an especially Australian cast of mind.
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