Austrasia


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Aus·tra·sia

 (ô-strā′zhə)
The eastern portion of the kingdom of the Franks from the sixth to the eighth century, including parts of eastern France, western Germany, and the Low Countries. It eventually became part of the Carolingian empire.

Aus·tra′sian adj. & n.

Austrasia

(ɒˈstreɪʒə; -ʃə)
n
1. (Placename) the eastern region of the kingdom of the Merovingian Franks that had its capital at Metz and lasted from 511 ad until 814 ad. It covered the area now comprising NE France, Belgium, and western Germany
2. (Historical Terms) the eastern region of the kingdom of the Merovingian Franks that had its capital at Metz and lasted from 511 ad until 814 ad. It covered the area now comprising NE France, Belgium, and western Germany

Aus•tra•sia

(ɔˈstreɪ ʒə, -ʃə)

n.
the E part of the kingdom of the Franks of the 6th–8th centuries, composed of what is now NE France, W Germany, and Belgium.
References in periodicals archive ?
All real estate as an independent island bordered by the square Mangin northwest, Rue Gambetta north / northeast, the Place du General de Gaulle southeast of Austrasia and the street to the west facade.
Theeuws, "Settlement Research and the Process of Manorialisation in Northern Austrasia," in S.
55) This suggests that Aldebert was active in Neustria, whereas Clemens was located somewhere in Austrasia.
In addition to the London final, regional ceremonies where World Travel Awards will raise funds for Just a Drop are: Africa and Indian Ocean (July 7, Johannesburg); North and Central America and Caribbean (September 11, Orlando); Europe (October 1, Antalya, Turkey); Asia and Austrasia and South America (October 14, New Delhi, India); and South America (October 20, Rio de Janeiro).
Episcopal might recurs as an obvious motif through Eddius's (Stephanus') Life of him--his splendid building programmes at York, Ripon and Hexham, his large retinues, the retinue which he provided for the Frankish Dagobert when he restored him to the throne of Austrasia, his treasure at Ripon, his lavish generosity, his bold speeches, his friendships and adept conversations with kings, the hatred he inspired in Queens.
This book is an attempt to demonstrate that Merovingian Gaul, which is here distinguished from north-eastern Austrasia and the Frankish territories beyond the Rhine, was completely `Christian': not only was `secularity' not an option, but paganism was confined to the utmost margins of society from within a generation of the arrival of the Franks.