Austria-Hungary


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Related to Austria-Hungary: Balkans, Ottoman Empire, German Empire

Aus·tri·a-Hun·ga·ry

 (ô′strē-ə-hŭng′gə-rē)
A former dual monarchy of central Europe consisting of Austria, Hungary, Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia, Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, and Italy. It was formed in 1867 after agitation by Hungarian nationalists within the Austrian empire and lasted until 1918.

Aus′tro-Hun·gar′i·an (ô′strō-hŭng-gâr′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Austria-Hungary

n
1. (Historical Terms) the Dual Monarchy established in 1867, consisting of what are now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and Italy. The empire was broken up after World War I
2. (Placename) the Dual Monarchy established in 1867, consisting of what are now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and Italy. The empire was broken up after World War I

Aus′tria-Hun′gary



n.
a former monarchy (1867–1918) in central Europe that included what is now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and parts of Romania, Poland, Yugoslavia, and Italy.
Aus′tro-Hungar′ian (ˌɔ stroʊ) adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Austria-Hungary - a geographical area in central and eastern EuropeAustria-Hungary - a geographical area in central and eastern Europe; broken into separate countries at the end of World War I
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Translations

Austria-Hungary

References in classic literature ?
Russia and Austria-Hungary have now about one hundred and twenty-five thousand telephones apiece.
12 was the standard pistol of Austria-Hungary during World War I and was also used by Chile, Bulgaria, Rumania and Bavaria.
Note these divisions were large formations, the more so as Austria-Hungary and Russia fielded divisions of eighteen and sixteen battalions respectively, compared to the more common twelve.
Italy being under customs war with France, uneasy by the rapprochement between the latter and Russia also being engaged in a colonial policy in Africa also agreed to renew the Triple Alliance, despite pressure from Paris and differences with Austria-Hungary, due to the problem of Italians in the Dual Monarchy and also because of the Balkans issue (Stieve, 1929: 44).
A second European area of contention was the Trentino, in the Tyrol region between Austria-Hungary and Italy, and a third was Trieste, a port city at the head of the Adriatic Sea.
August 6: Austria-Hungary declares war on Russia, and Serbia declares war on Germany.
In a matter of days Germany, Russia, Britain and France were all drawn into the war with western and eastern fronts rapidly opening along the borders of Germany and Austria-Hungary.
Austria-Hungary was alarmed by Serbia's nationalistic ambitions and five days earlier had delivered an ultimatum.
The opinion has gained ground in authoritative circles here (in Vienna, Austria) that the future of Austria-Hungary now, more than ever, depends on the health of the venerable Emperor, Francis Joseph.
Owens, a psychologist and historian who has lectured at several universities in the US and England, traces the lives of Emperor Franz Joseph and his wife Elisabeth, the last monarchs of Austria-Hungary.
Austria-Hungary was a multinational empire: apart from the German Austrians and Hungarians, it also contained Czechs, Poles, Ukrainians, Romanians, Slovaks, Italians, Serbs, Croats and Slovenes.
On July 28, 1914, Austria-Hungary rejected Serbia's reply to
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