Austria-Hungary

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Related to Austro-Hungarian Empire: Ottoman Empire, World War 1, German Empire

Aus·tri·a-Hun·ga·ry

 (ô′strē-ə-hŭng′gə-rē)
A former dual monarchy of central Europe consisting of Austria, Hungary, Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia, Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Ukraine, Romania, Serbia, and Italy. It was formed in 1867 after agitation by Hungarian nationalists within the Austrian empire and lasted until 1918.

Aus′tro-Hun·gar′i·an (ô′strō-hŭng-gâr′ē-ən) adj. & n.

Austria-Hungary

n
1. (Historical Terms) the Dual Monarchy established in 1867, consisting of what are now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and Italy. The empire was broken up after World War I
2. (Placename) the Dual Monarchy established in 1867, consisting of what are now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, and Bosnia-Herzegovina, and parts of Poland, Romania, Ukraine, and Italy. The empire was broken up after World War I

Aus′tria-Hun′gary



n.
a former monarchy (1867–1918) in central Europe that included what is now Austria, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and parts of Romania, Poland, Yugoslavia, and Italy.
Aus′tro-Hungar′ian (ˌɔ stroʊ) adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Austria-Hungary - a geographical area in central and eastern EuropeAustria-Hungary - a geographical area in central and eastern Europe; broken into separate countries at the end of World War I
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Translations

Austria-Hungary

References in periodicals archive ?
In 1886 the Austro-Hungarian empire adopted a rifle designed by Ferdinand von Mannlicher rifle, the Osterreichisches Repetier-Gewehr M.
He died less than two months before the outbreak of the catastrophic war which ended with the breakup of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the loss of some two thirds of Hungary's historic lands.
A fourth area in which the problem of national self-determination caused conflict was the Austro-Hungarian Empire itself, and a fifth was the Balkan region.
Two years later, the defeated Austro-Hungarian Empire expired as well.
As well as sparking the First World War, Franz Ferdinand's assassination also brought an end to the vast Austro-Hungarian empire he stood to inherit.
If it s a change of scenery you desire, the city offers a modern edge too, located in the lower part of the city, with striking buildings and parks, reflecting the city s standing in the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
The Austro-Hungarian Empire recognized the United States in 1797, when we established consular relations with a Consul in Trieste, then part of the Austrian empire.
The parts of Ukraine where proximity to Russia attracts the greatest disdain lie in the west of the country, which was part of Poland until the Second World War, and previously fell under a range of jurisdictions, including the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
The Sighet prison, which opened in 1897 under the Austro-Hungarian Empire, was mainly used for common criminals after 1918.
The so-called Polish salient gave Russia a chance to attack to the west into Imperial Germany and to the south into the Austro-Hungarian Empire.
Czechoslovakia, founded in 1918 after World War I brought down the Austro-Hungarian empire, split on January 1, 1993, just over three years after shedding its four-decade Communist regime.
His background chapters then consider the Austro-Hungarian Empire in detail after which he discusses the growth of alliances, the nature of various countries' foreign offices, and the 'crisis' of the Balkans from 1912-14.