Authorly

Au´thor`ly


a.1.Authorial.
References in periodicals archive ?
ONE of the by-products of the solitary authorly life is that, devoid of the distraction of colleagues, we tend to work - and think - in isolation, untroubled by the concerns of the wider world.
The work includes vignettes on the techniques of fiction writing, impish in its rundown to the reader of authorly ploys such as point of view, withholding information, or use of present tense.
The first time I heard one sound I reached for my coat and prepared to exit in an authorly manner (saving my books).
The chapter begins with the contention that Jonson's authorial ego should be understood as emerging in relation to other authorly self-representations, particularly Field's.
Translation, I have come to believe, radically unsettles the seemingly fixed categories of legal proprietorship, authorly ownership, translational appropriation, author-translator hand-holding, and third-party monitoring, rendering them all contingent upon, and relative to, the work done by the text itself, or the work of the verwerking.
authorly beastly brotherly cowardly fatherly gentlemanly granddaughterly housekeeperly husbandly kingly landlordly manly marksmanly matronly miserly motherly neighborly queenly saintly scholarly wifely womanly, etc.
Marston's borrowings may lie at the heart of his early experiments, may seek an effect as felicitous as that achieved in The Fawn's Gonzago, and may represent his writings at their most individual, most distinctive, and most authorly.
In sum, mine is much like the playful perspective related by Paul Auster in his Borgesian detective story City of Glass, in which he cites and reiterates Cervantes's raise en abime of authorly self-reference in the following exchange on the authorship of Don Quixote between detective Daniel Quinn (another "D.
Authorly narcissism appeals to what Leenhardt calls 'readerly narcissism' (38).
Helen Darville found her authorly role twisted and pulled by a variety of political and racial cross-purposes.
That she already had an admiring helpmeet and would later in her life embrace an attractive and subordinate young man, successfully incorporating his possession within her authorly identity, is nowhere suggested in Middlemarch.
It is difficult not to compare this authorly reticence and disengagement with the bracingly astringent comments of Whitney in his edition of the TPr.