autodidacticism


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autodidacticism

(ˌɔːtəʊdɪˈdæktɪsɪzəm)
n
any self-directed learning or self-education
Translations
samouctví
References in periodicals archive ?
For a detailed study of the circulation of stories about one feral child from the twelfth century on, see Avner Ben-Zaken, Reading Hayy Ibn-Yaqzan: A Cross-Cultural History of Autodidacticism (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011).
Though Ryman remains most closely identified with minimalism, his experimental autodidacticism --dedicated to discovering the possibilities of the materials on one hand and eliciting the viewer's delight on the other--makes his work hard to confine to any one school.
The film's themes include artistic freedom, religion, political ambiguity, autodidacticism, and the making of art under a repressive regime.
Unlike the majority of his Abstract Expressionist confreres, so marked by first-generation angst, autodidacticism, decades of poverty, and a tragic consciousness (arising from the Great Depression and the horrors of World War II), Motherwell was a child of California wealth and privilege.
Woolf's interest in autodidacticism for the common reader comes across in her preface to the Modern Library edition of Mrs.
The creature's precocious autodidacticism correlates with his preternatural physicality.
Putting Shakespeare's words into Turner's mouth gives some hint of the uncompromising and fierce intellectual range of the mineworker poets, bred in their ambitious autodidacticism.
The most revealing evidence for this intense autodidacticism is the composer's library, which unveils him as an ardent collector of Hungarian music; besides a few manuscript collections he compiled himself, his estate included around a hundred original Hungarian music prints.
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