avant-garde

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a·vant-garde

 (ä′vänt-gärd′, ăv′änt-)
n.
A group that creates or promotes innovative ideas or techniques in a given field, especially in the arts.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being part of an innovative group, especially one in the arts: avant-garde painters; an avant-garde theater piece.

[French, from Old French, vanguard; see vanguard.]

a′vant-gard′ism n.
a′vant-gard′ist n.

avant-garde

(ˌævɒŋˈɡɑːd; French avɑ̃ɡard)
n
those artists, writers, musicians, etc, whose techniques and ideas are markedly experimental or in advance of those generally accepted
adj
1. of such artists, etc, their ideas, or techniques
2. radical; daring
[from French: vanguard]
ˌavant-ˈgardism n
ˌavant-ˈgardist n

a•vant-garde

(əˌvɑntˈgɑrd, əˌvænt-, ˌæv ɑnt-, ˌɑ vɑnt-; Fr. a vɑ̃ˈgard)

n.
1. the advance group in a field, esp. in the arts, whose works are unorthodox and experimental.
adj.
2. characteristic of or belonging to the avant-garde.
[1910–15; < French: literally, fore-guard. See vanguard]
a•vant`-gard′ism, n.
a•vant`-gard′ist, n.

avant-garde

A French phrase meaning a vanguard, used to describe artists or ideas that are ahead of their time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.avant-garde - any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts)
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
Adj.1.avant-garde - radically new or original; "an avant-garde theater piece"
original - being or productive of something fresh and unusual; or being as first made or thought of; "a truly original approach"; "with original music"; "an original mind"

avant-garde

Translations

avant-garde

[ˈævɑːŋˈgɑːd]
A. ADJvanguardista, de vanguardia
B. Nvanguardia f

avant-garde

[ˌævɒŋˈgɑːrd] adjd'avant-garde

avant-garde

nAvantgarde f

avant-garde

[ˈævɒŋˈgɑːd]
1. navanguardia
2. adjd'avanguardia
References in periodicals archive ?
After the Soviet Union collapsed, those were replaced with anniversary themes such as"art and revolution," celebrating the convulsions of 1917 as nourishment for Russia's great avant-garde art.
This memoir covers his career and championing of avant-garde art in post-war America.
Thanks to his bravura technique, often compared favorably with the Renaissance masters, and his genius for self-promotion, Dali became arguably the most famous exponent of Surrealism, that school of avant-garde art that sought to overturn the rational world in favor of the illogical world of dreams.
In the years leading up to the First World War they were among the most prominent figures in Russian avant-garde art, taking part in and often helping to organize a series of major exhibitions in Moscow.
Approximately 50 paintings and sculptures will be on display, offering unprecedented insight into the history of modern art in the United States as, by 1950, the center of the avant-garde art world had shifted from Paris to New York City.
On the first floor, the collection of books in both Arabic and English is expansive, ranging from Western classics to modern-day Arab poets and avant-garde art.
Andriessen is one of Holland's most highly regarded composers and he helped young British composer Steven Martland develop his own talents in Amsterdam (which is considered to be one of the last bastions of avant-garde art.
Michael Crilly said their idea of a playable map was inspired by early 20th century European avant-garde art movement Dada, as well as the life-size chessboard which architect Ralph Erskine incorporated into the redevelopment of the Byker Wall estate in the seventies.
In contrast with the prevailing scholarship that often dismisses Moorman as a passive participant, Topless Cellist addresses her active role in New York's 1960s avant-garde art scene.
The competition was inspired by Dadaism, a European avant-garde art movement from the early twentieth century.
European avant-garde art is overrun with hallucinatory imagery: Max Ernst and Georg Baselitz in Germany, Henry Moore and Francis Bacon in England, Giorgio de Chirico and Francesco Clemente in Italy, among others.
The book identifies this enquiry in the works and manifestos of twentieth century avant-garde art and Lehmann's concept (broadly interpreted) of "postdramatic" theater.