avoidant


Also found in: Medical.

a·void·ant

 (ə-void′nt)
adj.
Tending to avoid or shun something, especially as a means of coping with anxiety or stress: risk-avoidant behavior; therapies aimed at socially avoidant children.

avoidant

(əˈvɔɪdənt)
adj
(of behaviour) demonstrating a tendency to avoid intimacy or interaction with others
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, although there were several significant findings, partner effects for avoidant God attachment and marital functioning, as well as horizontal faith maturity and marital functioning, did not emerge.
Instead, it eliminates almost a third of them, mainly because they did not meet the avoidant criteria.
Attachment is often measured in terms of anxious and avoidant dimensions (Fraley, Waller, & Brennan, 2000).
She said that instead, they find that avoidant actions that exert force away from one's representation of self are especially effective for reducing the anticipated negative consequences following a jinx.
He said productivity is the avoidant of waste and loss of time and certainly optimizes the attainment of quality output.
In our view, the most important difference between nonclinical and clinical samples may not be the use of rAMS as a form of avoidant coping per se, but the flexibility of its use.
13] considers three different attachment styles in his research including secure attachment, ambivalent attachment and avoidant attachment.
In this context, she had developed a self-reliant, avoidant pattern of relationships, in marked contrast to that of her husband.
Infants classified as avoidant show little to no desire for proximity or interaction with their mothers upon their return to the room.
Along the way he discusses the influence of the mother-child relationship according to four different types of the attachment/nurturing bond (intermittent, avoidant, depressed, and secure), which he argues provides the foundation for all future relationships; the strong influence of one's mother's spoken and unspoken rules about work, relationships, emotions, separation, and independence; and the impact of the mothering style (a combination of daily interactions, behaviors, emotional beliefs, and communication patterns) on personal and professional relationships of children.