evil eye

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evil eye

n.
1. A look or stare believed to cause injury or misfortune to others.
2. The presumed power to cause injury or misfortune to others by magic or supernatural means.

evil eye

n
1. (Alternative Belief Systems) a look or glance superstitiously supposed to have the power of inflicting harm or injury
2. (Alternative Belief Systems) the power to inflict harm, etc, by such a look
ˌevil-ˈeyed adj

e′vil eye′


n.
1. a look thought capable of inflicting injury or bad luck on someone.
2. the power, superstitiously attributed to certain persons, of such a look.
[before 1000]
e′vil-eyed′, adj.

evil eye

Also known as overlooking or fascinating this is a worldwide belief in the ability of some people (especially witches) and animals to bring about harm by looking at someone.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.evil eye - a look that is believed to have the power of inflicting harmevil eye - a look that is believed to have the power of inflicting harm
looking, looking at, look - the act of directing the eyes toward something and perceiving it visually; "he went out to have a look"; "his look was fixed on her eyes"; "he gave it a good looking at"; "his camera does his looking for him"

evil eye

noun
An object or power that one uses to cause often evil events:
Slang: whammy.
Translations
mau-olhado

evil eye

n to put the evil eye on sbgettare il malocchio su qn

evil eye

n mal m de ojo
References in periodicals archive ?
The kayn comes from the German for "no" and the ayin hara from Hebrew.
It was likely first used in medieval Germany, as a translation from the Hebrew b'li ayin hara, according to Rivka Ulmer, professor of Jewish studies at Bucknell University and author of The Evil Eye in the Bible and Rabbinic Litera-lure.
Benor tells us that bli ayin hara in Orthodox Jewish English comes from Modern Hebrew bli eyn hara, originally calqued on the Yiddish expression (p.