Baader-Meinhof Gang


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Baader-Meinhof Gang

(German ˈbaːdər ˈmainhoːf)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a group of left-wing West German terrorists, active in the 1970s, who were dedicated to the violent overthrow of capitalist society. Also known as: Red Army Faction
[C20: named after its leading members, Andreas Baader (1943–77) and Ulrike Meinhof (1934–76)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Baader-Meinhof Gang - a radical left-wing revolutionary terrorist group active in Germany from 1968 until 1977
act of terrorism, terrorism, terrorist act - the calculated use of violence (or the threat of violence) against civilians in order to attain goals that are political or religious or ideological in nature; this is done through intimidation or coercion or instilling fear
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
References in periodicals archive ?
Baader-Meinhof gang member Astrid Proll was arrested in London.
Critics of radical chic feminized the notion with the (admittedly clever) label "Prada Meinhof"--a play on the alternative appellation for RAF's first generation: the Baader-Meinhof Gang.
1975: A stand-off at the West German embassy in Stockholm ends in violence as the Baader-Meinhof gang blows up the building.
Former member of the Red Army Faction, known in its early days as the Baader-Meinhof gang Christof Wackernagel will be on a panel of experts speaking at the debate.
On the one hand: marriage, a PhD, going to work in Uganda, children, and a great job; on the other: widespread social and industrial strife, three-day weeks, unburied bodies, nuclear superpower tensions, the Red Brigades and the Baader-Meinhof Gang, wars everywhere, and famine, dreadful fashions, digital watches, dubious music, instant mashed potato, and the emergence of global concerns about the environment.
Later waves of fashion in terrorism included the European, Latin American and Japanese "urban terrorist" movements of the 1970s and 80s -- Baader-Meinhof Gang in Germany, Red Brigades in Italy, Montoneros in Argentina, Japanese Red Army and so on -- none of which has any political success at all.
Older readers may recall Germany's Baader-Meinhof Gang of murderers and Italy's Red Brigades or the violent riots by French students, which soon drew the support of French workers, shook Paris in 1968, and contributed to President de Gaulle's departure from power in 1969.
1978: German terror suspect arrested in UK Astrid Proll, one of the most wanted members of the West German Baader-Meinhof gang, has been detained in London.
They demanded that Israel release 234 Palestinian prisoners and Germany release the two founding members of the Baader-Meinhof Gang.
RAF, also called the Baader-Meinhof gang, waged a violent terrorist campaign against the West German state and especially U.
Indeed, the notion of a "war on terror" in reply was misguided in part because it allowed people to think that Al-Qaeda was just another terrorist group like the IRA, the Baader-Meinhof Gang, or the Red Brigades.