Tower of Babel

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Ba•bel

(ˈbeɪ bəl, ˈbæb əl)

n.
1. an ancient city in Shinar where people began building a tower (Tower of Babel) intended to reach heaven but were forced to abandon their work upon the confusion of their languages by God. Gen. 11:4–9.
2. (usu. l.c.) a confused mixture of sounds or voices.
3. (usu. l.c.) a scene of noise and confusion.
[< Hebrew Bābhel Babylon]
Ba•bel′ic (-ˈbɛl ɪk) adj.

Ba•bel

(ˈbæb əl)

n.
Isaak Emmanuilovich, 1894–1941, Russian author.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tower of Babel - (Genesis 11:1-11) a tower built by Noah's descendants (probably in Babylon) who intended it to reach up to heavenTower of Babel - (Genesis 11:1-11) a tower built by Noah's descendants (probably in Babylon) who intended it to reach up to heaven; God foiled them by confusing their language so they could no longer understand one another
Book of Genesis, Genesis - the first book of the Old Testament: tells of Creation; Adam and Eve; the Fall of Man; Cain and Abel; Noah and the flood; God's covenant with Abraham; Abraham and Isaac; Jacob and Esau; Joseph and his brothers
Babylon - the chief city of ancient Mesopotamia and capital of the ancient kingdom of Babylonia
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Babel Tower CEO Martin Keller, Babel Tower, a local company, has developed and implemented a new local technology that could save local water consumption in agriculture from 15 to 20 percent.
ESTIMO ARAB NEWS STAFFBabel Tower, a local company, has developed and implemented a new local technology that could save local water consumption in agriculture from 15 to 20 percent, according to Babel Tower CEO Martin Keller.
Eleven years separate Still Life from Babel Tower (1996) and A Whistling Woman (2002), the third and fourth novels in Byatt's tetralogy.
The next two chapters are centred on Byatt's Quartet (The Virgin in the Garden, 1978; Still Life, 1985; Babel Tower, 1996; and A Whistling Woman, 2002), condition-of-England novels which depict the 1950s to the 1970s.
ARGENTINA People stand in front of a tower of some 30,000 books in different languages, named Babel Tower, at San Martin Square, in Buenos Aires.
Byatt scatters narrative episodes and meta-artistic themes across a wide canvas in Babel Tower (1996), inventing and framing texts while juxtaposing literary and pictorial language.
Or, hike down into the gorge via the Babel Tower Trail.
We are effectively working for the setting-up of inter-disciplinarity (creation and usage of systemic concepts such as chaos, complexity, emergence, and openness) and trans-disciplinarity (when systemic properties are considered in general and in relation between them) in order to establish an architecture of knowledge and culture symmetrically opposite to the one represented by the Babel Tower.
Frederica Potter, the semi-autobiographical heroine of Byatt's tetralogy (The Virgin in the Garden, Still Life, Babel Tower and A Whistling Woman), doesn't become a novelist at all, although she thinks she should: "I don't have any ideas.
Set immediately following the events in Babel Tower (1997), A Whistling Woman takes place in the early years of the women's movement, as Frederica Potter becomes a popular author and television personality, and several of her female friends also follow their intellectual, scientific, and artistic talents.
Babel Tower, New Zealand, Vintage Random House Group Ltd.
The essay explores the intricacies of Byatt's Babel Tower (1996), the third volume in a tetralogy in progress.