Talmud

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Related to Babylonian Gemara: Mishnah, Talmudic

Tal·mud

 (täl′mo͝od, tăl′məd)
n. Judaism
The collection of ancient Rabbinic writings consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara, constituting the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism.

[Mishnaic Hebrew talmûd, learning, instruction, from Hebrew lāmad, to learn; see lmd in Semitic roots.]

Tal·mu′dic (täl-mo͞o′dĭk, -myo͞o′-, tăl-), Tal·mu′di·cal (-dĭ-kəl) adj.
Tal′mud·ist (täl′mo͝o-dĭst, tăl′mə-) n.

Talmud

(ˈtælmʊd)
n
1. (Judaism) the primary source of Jewish religious law, consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara
2. (Judaism) either of two recensions of this compilation, the Palestinian Talmud of about 375 ad, or the longer and more important Babylonian Talmud of about 500 ad
[C16: from Hebrew talmūdh, literally: instruction, from lāmadh to learn]
Talˈmudic, Talˈmudical adj
ˈTalmudism n

Tal•mud

(ˈtɑl mʊd, ˈtæl məd)

n.
1. the collection of Jewish law and tradition consisting of the Mishnah and the Gemara.
2. the Gemara.
[1525–35; < Hebrew talmūdh literally, instruction]
Tal•mud′ic, Tal•mud′i•cal, adj.
Tal′mud•ism, n.

Talmud

With the Tenakh, Judaism’s two most sacred collections of writings. This is a collection of legal and ethical writings, history, and folkore.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Talmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox JudaismTalmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism
Gemara - the second part of the Talmud consisting primarily of commentary on the Mishna
Mishna, Mishnah - the first part of the Talmud; a collection of early oral interpretations of the scriptures that was compiled about AD 200
Translations
Talmude

Talmud

[ˈtælmʊd] NTalmud m

Talmud

nTalmud m

Talmud

[ˈtælmʊd] nTalmud m
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of these recipes are concerned with the manipulation of water, and Veltri surmises that the writer of the Babylonian Gemara, Shlomo ben Shimshon, has sought to protect this Bavli manuscript magically from the flooding besetting Northern Europe at that time (p.