bacchanal

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Related to Bacchanals: bacchanalian

bac·cha·nal

 (băk′ə-năl′, -näl′, băk′ə-nəl)
n.
1. often bacchanals The Bacchanalia.
2. A participant in the Bacchanalia.
3. A drunken or riotous celebration.
4. A reveler.
adj.
Of, relating to, or typical of the worship of Bacchus.

[From Latin Bacchānālia; see Bacchanalia.]

bacchanal

(ˈbækənəl)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) a follower of Bacchus
2. a drunken and riotous celebration
3. a participant in such a celebration; reveller
adj
(Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to Bacchus
[C16: from Latin Bacchānālis; see Bacchus]

bac•cha•nal

(n. ˌbɑ kəˈnɑl, ˌbæk əˈnæl, ˈbæk ə nl; adj. ˈbæk ə nl)

n.
1. a worshipper of Bacchus.
2. a drunken reveler.
3. an occasion of drunken revelry; orgy; bacchanalia.
adj.
4. pertaining to Bacchus or the Bacchanalia.
[1530–40; < Latin Bacchānāl, derivative of Bacchus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacchanal - someone who engages in drinking boutsbacchanal - someone who engages in drinking bouts
imbiber, juicer, toper, drinker - a person who drinks alcoholic beverages (especially to excess)
2.bacchanal - a drunken revellerbacchanal - a drunken reveller; a devotee of Bacchus
buff, devotee, lover, fan - an ardent follower and admirer
3.bacchanal - a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuitybacchanal - a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity
revel, revelry - unrestrained merrymaking
Adj.1.bacchanal - used of riotously drunken merrymakingbacchanal - used of riotously drunken merrymaking; "a night of bacchanalian revelry"; "carousing bands of drunken soldiers"; "orgiastic festivity"
drunk, inebriated, intoxicated - stupefied or excited by a chemical substance (especially alcohol); "a noisy crowd of intoxicated sailors"; "helplessly inebriated"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
There are two things to be taken into consideration, both what is possible and what is proper; every one then should chiefly endeavour to attain those things which contain both these qualities: but this is to be regulated by different times of life; for instance, it is not easy for those who are advanced in years to sing such pieces of music as require very high notes, for nature points out to them those which are gentle and require little strength of voice (for which reason some who are skilful in music justly find fault with Socrates for forbidding the youth to be instructed in gentle harmony; as if, like wine, it would make them drunk, whereas the effect of that is to render men bacchanals, and not make them languid): these therefore are what should employ those who are grown old.
Let the reader picture to himself in bacchanal form, Salvator Rosa's battle.
That's for the external scale--but there is also something particular about the internal scale of these bacchanals.