bacchius

bacchius

(bæˈkaɪəs)
n, pl -chii (-ˈkaɪaɪ)
(Poetry) prosody a metrical foot of one short syllable followed by two long ones (˘¯¯). Compare dactyl
[C16: from Latin, from Greek Bakkheios (pous) a Bacchic (foot)]

bacchius

1. (in quantitative meter) a short syllable followed by two long.
2. (in accented meter) an unstressed syllable followed by two stressed. Cf. antibacchius. — bacchic, adj.
See also: Verse
References in periodicals archive ?
120) Justin was even willing to bet his life that Christians would be proven innocent of any crime if the government would simply investigate the allegations, and he did not write anonymously; instead, he identified himself by name: "Justin, son of Priscus and grandson of Bacchius, from Flavia Neapolis in Syria-Palestine.
Aristoteles, Euclides, Nicomachus, Bacchius, Gaudentius, Alypius et melodiarum veterum quidquid exstat.
Bacchius (3rd century BC) commented on a Hippocratic document, On Carcinosis, but this no longer exists.
Bacchius treats music as an activity whose processes and results are somehow equivalent.
In classical, particularly Latin, prosody, the first two syllables are long and the last is short (- - U ); this foot is not used in itself as the basis for any rhythm, but rather as a variant of the bacchius.
12-14 Winnington-Ingram)(11) and perhaps in Bacchius (Eisagoge 51, 304.
In Cleonides and Bacchius it appears only in a summary list of types of modulation.