Bacchus


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Related to Bacchus: Bacchius, bacchanalia, Hestia

Bac·chus

 (băk′əs)
n. Greek & Roman Mythology

[Latin, from Greek Bakkhos, of unknown origin.]

Bacchus

(ˈbækəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) (in ancient Greece and Rome) a god of wine and giver of ecstasy, identified with Dionysus
[C15: from Latin, from Greek Bakkhos; related to Latin bāca small round fruit, berry]

Di•o•ny•sus

or Di•o•ny•sos

(ˌdaɪ əˈnaɪ səs)

n.
an ancient Greek and Roman fertility god, associated esp. with the vine and wine.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bacchus - (classical mythology) god of wineBacchus - (classical mythology) god of wine; equivalent of Dionysus
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
capital of Italy, Eternal City, Italian capital, Rome, Roma - capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
Translations

Bacchus

[ˈbækəs] NBaco

Bacchus

nBacchus m

Bacchus

[ˈbækəs] nBacco
References in classic literature ?
Raphael's face was found boldly executed on the underside of the moulding board, and Bacchus on the head of a beer barrel.
It contained one of the precious stockings; and half opening it, I revealed to Sylvia's astonished eyes the cunning little frieze of Bacchus and Ariadne, followed by a troop of Satyrs and Bacchantes, which the artist had designed to encircle one of the white columns of that little marble temple which sat before me.
Conrade read the letter, which was in these words: ``Aymer, by divine grace, Prior of the Cistertian house of Saint Mary's of Jorvaulx, to Sir Brian de Bois-Guilbert, a Knight of the holy Order of the Temple, wisheth health, with the bounties of King Bacchus and of my Lady Venus.
Miller was an unsympathetic woman, who made no friends among the girls, and satisfied her affectionate impulses by petting a large cat named Gracchus, but generally called Bacchus by an endearing modification of the harsh initial consonant.
Students, citizens, soldiers, girls and matrons whirled light-heartedly before the inn with the figure of Bacchus for a sign.
Then I saw Phaedra, and Procris, and fair Ariadne daughter of the magician Minos, whom Theseus was carrying off from Crete to Athens, but he did not enjoy her, for before he could do so Diana killed her in the island of Dia on account of what Bacchus had said against her.
He it was that drove the nursing women who were in charge of frenzied Bacchus through the land of Nysa, and they flung their thyrsi on the ground as murderous Lycurgus beat them with his oxgoad.
This act Epicurus neither blamed nor praised; he was content to say as he poured a libation to Bacchus, 'As for death, there is nothing in death to move our laughter or our tears.
I have stolen away from the crowd in the groves, Where the nude statues stand, and the leaves point and shiver At ivy-crowned Bacchus, the Queen of the Loves, Pandora and Psyche, struck voiceless forever.
The captain coming up to have a little conversation, and to introduce a friend, seated himself astride of one of these barrels, like a Bacchus of private life; and pulling a great clasp-knife out of his pocket, began to 'whittle' it as he talked, by paring thin slices off the edges.
Tupman was somewhat indignant at the peremptory tone in which he was desired to pass the wine which the stranger passed so quickly away, or whether he felt very properly scandalised at an influential member of the Pickwick Club being ignominiously compared to a dismounted Bacchus, is a fact not yet completely ascertained.
Svidrigailov, relapsing into his old regimental habits, was under the influence of Bacchus.