bacteroides

(redirected from Bacteroides forsythus)
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Related to Bacteroides forsythus: Peptostreptococcus micros, Tannerella
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.bacteroides - type genus of BacteroidaceaeBacteroides - type genus of Bacteroidaceae; genus of Gram-negative rodlike anaerobic bacteria producing no endospores and no pigment and living in the gut of man and animals
bacteria genus - a genus of bacteria
Bacteroidaceae, family Bacteroidaceae - family of bacteria living usually in the alimentary canal or on mucous surfaces of warm-blooded animals; sometimes associated with acute infective processes
Translations

bacteroides

n. bacteroides, bacterias anaeróbicas, sin formación de esporas, con bastoncillos de gramnegativos, que constituyen la flora del tracto intestinal y se encuentran en menor cantidad en la cavidad respiratoria y la cavidad urinaria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Humoral Immune Responses to S-layer-Like Proteins of Bacteroides forsythus.
In addition, current smokers have poor healing ability, which is associated with persistent subgingival infection with Bacteroides forsythus and Porphyromonas gingivalis following sub gingival scaling and root planning when compared with ex-smokers and non-smokers (35).
Seventy-two percent of the surgical specimens indicated bacterial content and 44 percent of the atheromas contained at least one of the periodontal microorganisms studied (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Bacteroides forsythus and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans).
Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides forsythus and other putative periodontal pathogens in subjects with and without periodontal destruction.
Risk factors for and indicators of periodontitis were classified so: presence of bacteria (actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, bacteroides forsythus, porphyromonasgingivalis, treponemadenticola), heredity, race, ethnicity, advanced age, compromised host defense, systemic diseases, diabetes, stress, history of periodontitis, inadequate margins on crowns and dental restorations, poor oral hygiene, male gender, tobacco smoking (Drisko, 2000).