bags

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bag

 (băg)
n.
1.
a. A container of flexible material, such as paper, plastic, or leather, that is used for carrying or storing items.
b. A handbag; a purse.
c. A piece of hand luggage, such as a suitcase or satchel.
d. A pouchlike or sagging organ or part of the body, such as a cow's udder.
2. An object that resembles a pouch.
3. Nautical The sagging or bulging part of a sail.
4. The amount that a bag can hold.
5. An amount of game taken or legally permitted to be taken.
6. Baseball A base.
7. Slang An area of interest or skill: Cooking is not my bag.
8. Slang A woman considered ugly or unkempt.
v. bagged, bag·ging, bags
v.tr.
1. To put into a bag: bag groceries.
2. To cause to bulge like a pouch.
3. To capture or kill as game: bagged six grouse.
4. Informal
a. To gain; acquire: He bagged a profit from the sale.
b. To capture or arrest: was bagged for trespassing.
c. To accomplish or achieve: bagged a birdie with a long putt.
5. Slang
a. To fail to attend purposely; skip: bagged classes for the day and went to the beach.
b. To stop doing or considering; abandon: bagged the idea and started from scratch.
c. To terminate the employment of.
v.intr.
1. To pack items in a bag.
2. To hang loosely: The pants bag at the knees.
3. To swell out; bulge.
Phrasal Verb:
bag out
To quit or abandon an activity.
Idioms:
bag and baggage
1. With all one's belongings.
2. To a complete degree; entirely.
bag it Slang
1. To cease participating in an activity: Finally in disgust I told my debating opponent to bag it.
2. To bring along one's lunch, as in a paper bag: I don't like cafeteria food, so I always bag it.
in the bag
Assured of a successful outcome; virtually accomplished or won.

[Middle English bagge, from Old Norse baggi.]

bag′ful n.
bag′ger n.

bags

(bæɡz)
pl n
1. informal a lot; a great deal
2. (Clothing & Fashion) short for Oxford bags
3. (Clothing & Fashion) informal Brit any pair of trousers
interj
4. children's slang Also: bags I Brit and Austral an indication of the desire to do, be, or have something
5. rough as bags rough as sacks Austral and NZ uncouth
Translations
fúra
References in periodicals archive ?
At this time each year, I traditionally write to remind my fellow road users to pack a shovel, a bag of sand and some thick clothing into the boot of the car, just in case we get Arctic weather conditions and get stranded.
On his thirteenth birthday, foster child Alcatraz Smedry gets a bag of sand in the mail-his only inheritance from his father and mother.
To grow carrots or radishes, mix in a bag of sand with soil in garden beds; both crops appreciate quick drainage and loose soil.
Indian patio stone never arrived and in one case the only materials supplied was a PS30 to PS40 bag of sand.
They will donate PS1 from the sale of every bulk bag of sand, decorative gravel or aggregate to Cancer Research UK and they are aiming to raise about PS50,000 for the charity.
To mark the occasion and to thank the communities they serve branches throughout the year donated a PS1 to the Wales Air Ambulance for every big bag of sand sold.
This incident was entirely preventable and had Mr Morrow not fortuitously landed on a bag of sand, his injuries could have been a lot worse," he added.
Sacrificing their own safety, they cut open bag after bag of sand, forcing the fire back uphill inch by inch.
Or, in a strange modern twist, we could also buy a bag of sand with gems to just pour into the sieves - completely bypassing the fun stage of panning.
While pine bows, a bag of sand, or a broken-up bale of hay can all help out in these situations, sometimes you just can't find any good natural material.
After 61 goalless minutes at Goodison, I was hopeful I would make more than a bag of sand from the night.