Baganda


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Baganda

(bəˈɡændə; -ˈɡɑːn-)
n
(Peoples) (functioning as plural) a Negroid people of E Africa living chiefly in Uganda. See also Ganda1, Luganda

Ba•gan•da

(bəˈgæn də, -ˈgɑn-)
n.pl.
the Ganda people collectively.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He invited the exiled Ronald Edward Frederick Kimera Muwenda Mutebi II, the son of Kabaka Edward Muteesa II, to return to the country and take up his customary position and duties, thus earning enormous goodwill from the Baganda people.
In Uganda, the use of Kiswahili has also expanded gradually, in spite of resistance from hard-core Baganda traditionalists.
Here, the quintessential example is perhaps the Buganda Kingdom in the Uganda Protectorate, in which 'Baganda sub-imperialism' or the use of Baganda agents as administrators, chiefs, and tax collectors became one of the principal means of integrating various relatively acephalous societies into the colonial state (e.
The anthropological literature documented this practice as common amongst the Venda and Lovedu of South Africa (2,3) in the central and northern part of Mozambique (4) in the south of Tanzania amongst the Makonde speaking people (5) in the central region of Uganda among the Baganda linguistic group (6) in Zambia among the Bemba (7) and in Zimbabwe amongst the Shona (8,9).
Sylvia Nannyonga-Tamusuza gives another interesting ethnographic perspective on music and gender socialization in Baganda children in Uganda.
Tenders are invited for construction of cement concrete road at kantakhali manashatola to baganda sahapara via bagandah fish market, dhandali g.
In 2015, he will publish a second novel, titled Baganda, and a collectionof poetry titled Siratou Wahm ( A Biography of an Illusion ).
His Ekitabo Kye Mpisa za Baganda [The Customs of the Baganda] was published in the Luganda language in 1918 and expands upon the earlier ethnography published in 1911 by John Roscoe of the Church Missionary Society.
The widespread Baganda conversions were seen as a great missionary success story, in which Apolo epitomized and exemplified what CMS missionaries had prayed for: a native agent who showed lifelong commitment to the spreading of the Gospel and a willingness to sacrifice personal comfort and advancement for this goal.
I relied on interviews, narratives and observation in the territories of eight selected ethnic identities of Uganda, namely the Acholi, Iteso, Bagisu, Baganda, Bahima, Bakiga, Lugbara and the Jonam.
The Kabaka, King of the largest and best educated tribe in Uganda, the Baganda, had fled his Rubaga stronghold and palace, to exile in Britain.