Baganda


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Related to Baganda: Buganda

Baganda

(bəˈɡændə; -ˈɡɑːn-)
n
(Peoples) (functioning as plural) a Negroid people of E Africa living chiefly in Uganda. See also Ganda1, Luganda

Ba•gan•da

(bəˈgæn də, -ˈgɑn-)
n.pl.
the Ganda people collectively.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Sylvia Nannyonga-Tamusuza gives another interesting ethnographic perspective on music and gender socialization in Baganda children in Uganda.
The Baganda people today make nearly 6 million of Uganda's population.
Tenders are invited for construction of cement concrete road at kantakhali manashatola to baganda sahapara via bagandah fish market, dhandali g.
The widespread Baganda conversions were seen as a great missionary success story, in which Apolo epitomized and exemplified what CMS missionaries had prayed for: a native agent who showed lifelong commitment to the spreading of the Gospel and a willingness to sacrifice personal comfort and advancement for this goal.
I relied on interviews, narratives and observation in the territories of eight selected ethnic identities of Uganda, namely the Acholi, Iteso, Bagisu, Baganda, Bahima, Bakiga, Lugbara and the Jonam.
The Kabaka, King of the largest and best educated tribe in Uganda, the Baganda, had fled his Rubaga stronghold and palace, to exile in Britain.
One of the remarkable acts by the ARLPI, perhaps emulating the Pope's call for peace and forgiveness, is that as leaders from the north they publicly apologized for the atrocities that had been committed on the people in the south, especially the Baganda, by the former northern-led governments.
The groups living in these regions, the Baganda and Basoga, speak mutually intelligible languages respectively called Luganda and Lusoga.
In the case of Uganda, this last stage involved the superimposition of British administration over local rulers, who either gained from the arrangement (especially Baganda notables) or at least reached an acceptable level of imposition at the time.
Lexicostatistical analyses such as the one conducted by Kembo-Sure (12) between Olusuba, the language of the Suba people, and Luganda, spoken by the Baganda, among other languages actually demonstrate that the Abasuba are Bantu, of the Niger-Congo affiliation, and that their language exhibits a high linguistic intelligibility with Luganda.
Violence flared as soldiers tried to clear members of the powerful Baganda tribe from an historic royal tomb after it was destroyed in a fire.