Bahasa Malaysia


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Baha′sa Malay′sia


n.
the form of Malay used as the official language of Malaysia.
Also called Baha′sa Ma′lay.
[< Malay: Malaysian language]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Bahasa Malaysia - the Malay language spoken in MalaysiaBahasa Malaysia - the Malay language spoken in Malaysia
Malay - a western subfamily of Western Malayo-Polynesian languages
References in periodicals archive ?
Tan is fluent in English, Cantonese and Bahasa Malaysia, and speaks conversational Mandarin.
Languages Supported include: English, Chinese, French, Spanish, German, Italian, Russian, Portuguese, Turkish, Taiwanese, Japanese, Thai, Indonesian, Vietnamese, Bahasa Malaysia and Korean
com/Ramadan is appearing worldwide starting from Thursday, and it appears with five languages: Arabic, English, Turkish, Bahasa Indonesia and Bahasa Malaysia.
The bank has launched its first multilingual mobile banking app, PB engage, which provides services in three languages, Bahasa Malaysia, English and Chinese.
It also offers a bachelor of ministry programme in conjunction with the Malaysia Bible Seminary, a programme started in 2008 in the Bahasa Malaysia language, and in collaboration with ATTI, Batu Balang, Indonesia.
The Malaysian edition features dual language definitions where the first section of the dictionary provides Bahasa Malaysia definitions and the second section provides definitions in English.
He said ATMs currently used three languages - Bahasa Malaysia, English and Mandarin.
The fiction material includes both English and Bahasa Malaysia literature.
All programmes will be available to viewers across Malaysia in both English as well as Bahasa Malaysia.
But the debate continues in Malaysia over the translation of the word God in Bahasa Malaysia.
The Herald has been using Allah in its Bahasa Malaysia, the country's national language, publication since 1995, but it was not until 2006 that it was warned by the government to stop using "Allah" to refer to God.
As much as this was cheered on by Malay nationalists, critics of the new move complained that "you cannot really convey the scientific concepts to the students in Bahasa Malaysia at a very high level.