balustrade

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bal·us·trade

 (băl′ə-strād′)
n.
A rail and the row of balusters or posts that support it, as along the front of a gallery.

[French, from Italian balaustrata, from balaustro, baluster; see baluster.]

balustrade

(ˈbæləˌstreɪd)
n
(Architecture) an ornamental rail or coping with its supporting set of balusters
[C17: from French, from balustre baluster]

bal•us•trade

(ˈbæl əˌstreɪd, ˌbæl əˈstreɪd)

n.
a railing with its supporting balusters.
[1635–45; < French; see baluster]
bal′us•trad`ed, adj.

Balustrade

 a row or assemblage of balusters or turned pillars—Johnson, 1755.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.balustrade - a railing at the side of a staircase or balcony to prevent people from fallingbalustrade - a railing at the side of a staircase or balcony to prevent people from falling
balcony - a platform projecting from the wall of a building and surrounded by a balustrade or railing or parapet
baluster - one of a number of closely spaced supports for a railing
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
rail, railing - a barrier consisting of a horizontal bar and supports
Translations

balustrade

[ˌbæləsˈtreɪd] Nbalaustrada f, barandilla f

balustrade

[ˌbæləˈstreɪd] nbalustrade f

balustrade

nBalustrade f

balustrade

[ˌbæləsˈtreɪd] nbalaustrata
References in classic literature ?
A stony business altogether, with heavy stone balustrades, and stone urns, and stone flowers, and stone faces of men, and stone heads of lions, in all directions.
I forget, too, at what hour the gates were opened in the morning, admitting of my going in; but I know that I was often up at six o'clock, and that my favourite lounging-place in the interval was old London Bridge, where I was wont to sit in one of the stone recesses, watching the people going by, or to look over the balustrades at the sun shining in the water, and lighting up the golden flame on the top of the Monument.
It has only one clear story above the ground-floor; but the roof, rising steeply, has several projecting windows, with carved spandrels rather elegantly enclosed in oaken frames, and externally adorned with balustrades.
From the high ground on which it stood a series of terraces bordered by balustrades and urns descended in the steel-engraving style to a small irregular lake with an asphalt edge overhung by rare weeping conifers.
But its roomy staircases, passages, and antechambers still remain; and even its painted ceilings, where Allegory, in Roman helmet and celestial linen, sprawls among balustrades and pillars, flowers, clouds, and big-legged boys, and makes the head ache--as would seem to be Allegory's object always, more or less.
Some have great broad stone staircases leading down to the water, with heavy stone balustrades ornamented with statuary and fancifully adorned with creeping vines and bright-colored flowers--for all the world like a drop curtain in a theatre, and lacking nothing but long-waisted, high-heeled women and plumed gallants in silken tights coming down to go serenading in the splendid gondola in waiting.
But he preserved his easy attitude; and nothing more solid went over the stone balustrades than the accumulated rosebuds now floating about, a little surface-island.
behind the door and very like though too much forehead and as to a pillar with a marble pavement and balustrades and a mountain, I never saw him near it nor not likely in the wine trade, excellent man but not at all in that way.
The staircase, balustrades, and rails, had a spare look--an air of being denuded to the bone--which the panels of the walls and the jambs of the doors and windows also bore.
Pickwick leaned over the balustrades of Rochester Bridge, contemplating nature, and waiting for breakfast.
Roses covered the walls of the house, draped the cornices, climbed the pillars, and ran riot over the balustrade of the wide terrace, whence one looked down on the sunny Mediterranean, and the white-walled city on its shore.
It opened above the porch, where there had formerly been a balcony, the balustrade of which had long since gone to decay, and been removed.