Bambara

(redirected from Bamana)

Bam·ba·ra

 (bäm-bä′rä)
n. pl. Bam·ba·ra or Bam·ba·ras
1. A member of a people of the upper Niger River valley.
2. The Mande language of the Bambara, used as a lingua franca in Mali.

Bambara

(bɑːmˈbɑːrə)
npl -ra or -ras
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of W Africa living chiefly in Mali and by the headwaters of the River Niger in Guinea
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Mande branch of the Niger-Congo family

Bam•ba•ra

(bɑmˈbɑr ɑ, -ˈbɑr ə)

n., pl. -ras, (esp. collectively) -ra.
1. a member of an African people living mainly in S Mali, to the E and S of Bamako.
2. a group of dialects of the Mande language shared by the Bambara and Malinke.
Translations
Bambara
Бамбара
bamanabamanaiabamanakanbambarabaumana
bambarština
bambara
Bambara
BambaraBambara lingvo
bambara keel
bamanankanbambara
bambara
bambara
bambara
bahasa Bambara
bambara
bambara
バンバラ語
밤바라어
lingua Bambara
bambarų
bambaru valoda
Bambara
bambara
bamanabambara
bambara
bambarščina
BamanaBambaraБаманаБамбара
bambara
Kibambara
Bambara
بمبارا
tiếng Bambara
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract notice: Project management mission for the rehabilitation of existing halls at youna bamana high school
Their topics include tono-genesis and tonal alternations in Khaling, tonal inflection in Mande languages: the cases of Bamana and Dan-Gweetaa, tone and inflection in Zenzontepec Chatino, tonal overwriting and inflectional exponence in Amuzgo, abstract and concrete tonal classes in Itunyoso Triqui person morphology, and verbal inflection in Yolox chitl Mixtec.
Look at the Bamana language for example, "I ne sogoma.
Vicariat Apostolique de Bamako, Soudan Francais (1947) Bamana katessis (Catechisme bambara).
It was originally made by women, and some men, among the Bamana people of Mali, West Africa.
Wooten (2003) describes the more general pattern that the elders dominate younger folks and men have more power than women among the Bamana of rural Mali.
Cultural Group Massai Bamana Homeland Area Kenya, Tanzania Mali Mask Style Face mask with Helmet crest mask headdress with veil or face mask Materials Red-painted, Carved wood, cowry carved wood shells, brass Mask Traits Traditional warrior Ntomo society masks hairstyle of red have row of horns; braids; animal Tyi Wara helmet images and patterns crest masks feature antelopes Example Warrior and hunting Ntomo society masks Cultural masks ensure are used in manhood Mask Event success.
A State of Intrigue: The Epic of Bamana Segu according to Tayiru Banbera.
The haphazard encounter would launch her on a journey to discover African drumming and culture, eventually landing her in Guinea, the home of Jebebara, the unity drum, named by the Bamana people of Mali.
The collection represents 32 tribes, mostly from West Africa, including Dogon, Baule and Bamana.
She explains the country's religion and worldview, with discussion of Islam, Christianity, and Tuareg, Bamana, Dogon, and Senufo religions and other traditions.
Before the floating forms and figures of Miro's whimsical Personnages et Oiseaux Devant le Soleil (estimate 4m [pounds sterling]-6m [pounds sterling]), for instance, stand a Bamana figure from Mali (20,000 [pounds sterling]-30,000 [pounds sterling]) and Alexander Calder's Two Legs and a Belly (200,000[pounds sterling]-300,000[pounds sterling]), a standing mobile dated around 1959 that echoes the forms, references and palette of the Miro oil.