bank run

(redirected from Bank Panics)
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Noun1.bank run - the concerted action of depositors who try to withdraw their money from a bank because they think it will failbank run - the concerted action of depositors who try to withdraw their money from a bank because they think it will fail
bank withdrawal - the withdrawal of money from your account at a bank
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, between the Civil War and the Fed's creation, major bank panics followed by recessions occurred only in 1873, 1893, and 1907, and none of those events approached the severity of the Great Depression.
Contemporary expert opinion knew that the unit-bank system was the reason behind chronic American bank panics and crises.
7) Bank panics could be devastating to economic activity because they disrupted the ability to make payments conveniently.
For example, Bernanke explains how bank panics occur and why they are dangerous without dragging his readers through a money and banking lecture.
Bank panics prompted the clearing house managers to add a lending function to their clearing operations.
Nevertheless, even bank panics that affect the "whole" banking system tend to be isolated to a single country or closely-linked group of countries, and this means that there will still be private lenders in other banking systems able to grant loans on mutually beneficial terms.
lt;ul> <li>It was created to stabilize the banking system and keep bank panics from occurring.
A substantial immediate haircut on the sovereign debt of the vulnerable eurozone countries would be so destructive that it would set off a new round of bank panics.
banks reached their bottom limit for gold storage, leading to further bank panics.
Of course, during the bank panics of the early 30's, cash drain put severe pressure on reserve levels while Federal Reserve credit increases did not restore bank reserves.
What is more, they say the countermeasures he took to intervene were exactly what congress created the independent agency to do in 1913 after a series of bank panics.
Gorton (1988) and Tallman (1988) challenge the view that bank panics caused declines in real economic activity.