Banks


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Related to Banks: Types of Banks

bank 1

 (băngk)
n.
1. A piled-up mass, as of snow or clouds; a heap: a bank of thunderclouds.
2. A steep natural incline.
3. An artificial embankment.
4. often banks
a. The slope of land adjoining a body of water, especially adjoining a river, lake, or channel.
b. A large elevated area of a sea floor.
5. Games The cushion of a billiard or pool table.
6. The lateral inward tilting, as of a motor vehicle or an aircraft, in turning or negotiating a curve.
v. banked, bank·ing, banks
v.tr.
1. To border or protect with a ridge or embankment.
2. To pile up; amass: banked earth along the wall.
3. To cover (a fire), as with ashes or fresh fuel, to ensure continued low burning.
4. To construct with a slope rising to the outside edge: The turns on the racetrack were steeply banked.
5.
a. To tilt (an aircraft) laterally and inwardly in flight.
b. To tilt (a motor vehicle) laterally and inwardly when negotiating a curve.
6. Games To strike (a billiard ball) so that it rebounds from the cushion of the table.
7. Sports To play (a ball or puck) in such a way as to make it glance off a surface, such as a backboard or wall.
v.intr.
1. To rise in or take the form of a bank.
2. To tilt an aircraft or a motor vehicle laterally when turning.

[Middle English, of Scandinavian origin.]

bank 2

 (băngk)
n.
1.
a. A business establishment in which money is kept for saving or commercial purposes or is invested, supplied for loans, or exchanged.
b. The offices or building in which such an establishment is located.
2. Games
a. The funds of a gambling establishment.
b. The funds held by a dealer or banker in certain games, especially gambling games.
c. The reserve pieces, cards, chips, or play money in some games, such as poker, from which the players may draw.
3.
a. A supply or stock for future or emergency use: a grain bank.
b. Medicine A supply of human fluids or tissues, such as blood, sperm, or skin, that is stored in a facility for future use.
4. A place of safekeeping or storage: a computer's memory bank.
v. banked, bank·ing, banks
v.tr.
1. To deposit in a bank.
2. To store for future use.
v.intr.
1. To transact business with a bank or maintain a bank account.
2. To operate a bank.
Phrasal Verb:
bank on
To have confidence in; rely on.

[Middle English banke, from French banque, from Old Italian banca, bench, moneychanger's table, from Old High German banc.]

bank 3

 (băngk)
n.
1. A set of similar or matched things arranged in a row, especially:
a. A set of elevators.
b. A row of keys on a keyboard.
2. Nautical
a. A bench for rowers in a galley.
b. A row of oars in a galley.
3. Printing The lines of type under a headline.
tr.v. banked, bank·ing, banks
To arrange or set up in a row: "Every street was banked with purple-blooming trees" (Doris Lessing).

[Middle English, bench, from Old French banc, from Late Latin bancus, of Germanic origin.]

Banks

 (băngks), Sir Joseph 1743-1820.
British botanist noted for his circumnavigation of the globe (1768-1771) with James Cook, during which he collected and cataloged numerous specimens of plants and animals.

Banks

(bæŋks)
n
1. (Biography) Iain (Menzies). 1954–2013, Scottish novelist and science fiction writer. His novels include The Wasp Factory (1984), The Crow Road (1992), and The Steep Approach to Garbadale (2007); science-fiction (under the name Iain M. Banks) includes Look to Windward (2000)
2. (Biography) Sir Joseph. 1743–1820, British botanist and explorer: circumnavigated the world with James Cook (1768–71)

Banks

(bæŋks)

n.
Sir Joseph, 1734–1820, English naturalist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Banks - English botanist who accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1743-1820)Banks - English botanist who accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1743-1820)
References in classic literature ?
As he wandered up and down on the banks of the mill-pond he heard a rustling in the water, and when he looked near he saw a white woman rising up from the waves.
At nine o'clock the bank opened and began to pay the waiting throng; but then, what good did that do Marija, who saw three thousand people before her--enough to take out the last penny of a dozen banks?
A relation who was a high official in one of the banks, who would finance me on my mere name--could anything be better?
As it was known that one of them could not swim, it was hoped that the banks of the Quicourt River would bring them to a halt.
It could serve no good purpose to linger until night by the banks of the river.
They could see little of the country through which they were passing, because of the high banks, and they met with no boats or other craft upon the surface of the river.
By May tenth, the ice of the Stewart, with a great rending and snapping, tore loose from the banks and rose three feet.
In addition, subscriptions were received at the following banks in the different states of the two continents:
The men was all to the Banks, and Counahan he whacked up an iverlastin' hard crowd fer crew.
The water, the banks, the forests, the now distant bridge, fort and men, all were commingled and blurred.
What picnics he gives on the banks of the Thames in the summer season
IT is no part of mine to narrate the adventures of John Nicholson, which were many, but simply his more momentous misadventures, which were more than he desired, and, by human standards, more than he deserved; how he reached California, how he was rooked, and robbed, and beaten, and starved; how he was at last taken up by charitable folk, restored to some degree of self-complacency, and installed as a clerk in a bank in San Francisco, it would take too long to tell; nor in these episodes were there any marks of the peculiar Nicholsonic destiny, for they were just such matters as befell some thousands of other young adventurers in the same days and places.