Banks


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Banks: Types of Banks

bank 1

 (băngk)
n.
1. A piled-up mass, as of snow or clouds; a heap: a bank of thunderclouds.
2. A steep natural incline.
3. An artificial embankment.
4. often banks
a. The slope of land adjoining a body of water, especially adjoining a river, lake, or channel.
b. A large elevated area of a sea floor.
5. Games The cushion of a billiard or pool table.
6. The lateral inward tilting, as of a motor vehicle or an aircraft, in turning or negotiating a curve.
v. banked, bank·ing, banks
v.tr.
1. To border or protect with a ridge or embankment.
2. To pile up; amass: banked earth along the wall.
3. To cover (a fire), as with ashes or fresh fuel, to ensure continued low burning.
4. To construct with a slope rising to the outside edge: The turns on the racetrack were steeply banked.
5.
a. To tilt (an aircraft) laterally and inwardly in flight.
b. To tilt (a motor vehicle) laterally and inwardly when negotiating a curve.
6. Games To strike (a billiard ball) so that it rebounds from the cushion of the table.
7. Sports To play (a ball or puck) in such a way as to make it glance off a surface, such as a backboard or wall.
v.intr.
1. To rise in or take the form of a bank.
2. To tilt an aircraft or a motor vehicle laterally when turning.

[Middle English, of Scandinavian origin.]

bank 2

 (băngk)
n.
1.
a. A business establishment in which money is kept for saving or commercial purposes or is invested, supplied for loans, or exchanged.
b. The offices or building in which such an establishment is located.
2. Games
a. The funds of a gambling establishment.
b. The funds held by a dealer or banker in certain games, especially gambling games.
c. The reserve pieces, cards, chips, or play money in some games, such as poker, from which the players may draw.
3.
a. A supply or stock for future or emergency use: a grain bank.
b. Medicine A supply of human fluids or tissues, such as blood, sperm, or skin, that is stored in a facility for future use.
4. A place of safekeeping or storage: a computer's memory bank.
v. banked, bank·ing, banks
v.tr.
1. To deposit in a bank.
2. To store for future use.
v.intr.
1. To transact business with a bank or maintain a bank account.
2. To operate a bank.
Phrasal Verb:
bank on
To have confidence in; rely on.

[Middle English banke, from French banque, from Old Italian banca, bench, moneychanger's table, from Old High German banc.]

bank 3

 (băngk)
n.
1. A set of similar or matched things arranged in a row, especially:
a. A set of elevators.
b. A row of keys on a keyboard.
2. Nautical
a. A bench for rowers in a galley.
b. A row of oars in a galley.
3. Printing The lines of type under a headline.
tr.v. banked, bank·ing, banks
To arrange or set up in a row: "Every street was banked with purple-blooming trees" (Doris Lessing).

[Middle English, bench, from Old French banc, from Late Latin bancus, of Germanic origin.]

Banks

 (băngks), Sir Joseph 1743-1820.
British botanist noted for his circumnavigation of the globe (1768-1771) with James Cook, during which he collected and cataloged numerous specimens of plants and animals.

Banks

(bæŋks)
n
1. (Biography) Iain (Menzies). 1954–2013, Scottish novelist and science fiction writer. His novels include The Wasp Factory (1984), The Crow Road (1992), and The Steep Approach to Garbadale (2007); science-fiction (under the name Iain M. Banks) includes Look to Windward (2000)
2. (Biography) Sir Joseph. 1743–1820, British botanist and explorer: circumnavigated the world with James Cook (1768–71)

Banks

(bæŋks)

n.
Sir Joseph, 1734–1820, English naturalist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Banks - English botanist who accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1743-1820)Banks - English botanist who accompanied Captain Cook on his first voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1743-1820)
References in classic literature ?
She lives on the banks of Killarney; From the glance of her eye, Shun danger and fly, For fatal's the glance of Kate Kearney.
The river narrowed and flowed sluggishly between the banks which were luxuriant with tropical growth.
As we approached the Shimerdas' dwelling, I could still see nothing but rough red hillocks, and draws with shelving banks and long roots hanging out where the earth had crumbled away.
She disappeared among the reeds and willows that grew thick along the banks of the deep, sluggish bayou; and she did not come back again.
Thus a literal translation of the name of this beautiful sheet of water, used by the tribe that dwelt on its banks, would be "The Tail of the Lake.
And we view Kentucke situated on the fertile banks of the great Ohio, rising from obscurity to shine with splendor, equal to any other of the stars of the American hemisphere.
The half a dozen cabins scattered along the banks of the North Fork, as if by some overflow of that capricious river, had become augmented during a week of fierce excitement by twenty or thirty others, that were huddled together on the narrow gorge of Devil's Spur, or cast up on its steep sides.
How he would figure among them in the churchyard, between services on Sundays; gathering grapes for them from the wild vines that overran the surrounding trees; reciting for their amusement all the epitaphs on the tombstones; or sauntering, with a whole bevy of them, along the banks of the adjacent mill-pond; while the more bashful country bumpkins hung sheepishly back, envying his superior elegance and address.
It is the whale which for more than two centuries past has been hunted by the Dutch and English in the Arctic seas; it is the whale which the American fishermen have long pursued in the Indian ocean, on the Brazil Banks, on the Nor' West Coast, and various other parts of the world, designated by them Right Whale Cruising Grounds.
By my retentive memory of the hieroglyphics upon one Sperm Whale in particular, I was much struck with a plate representing the old Indian characters chiselled on the famous hieroglyphic palisades on the banks of the Upper Mississippi.
The river banks were rather high, and the bridge, instead of rising, went across just level, so that in the middle, if the river was full, the water would be nearly up to the woodwork and planks; but as there were good substantial rails on each side, people did not mind it.
The banks of "Bubbly Creek" are plastered thick with hairs, and this also the packers gather and clean.