baobab

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ba·o·bab

 (bā′ō-băb′, bä′-)
n.
Any of several trees of the genus Adansonia of Africa, Madagascar, and Australia, especially the tropical African species A. digitata, having palmately compound leaves, edible gourdlike fruits, and a broad trunk that stores water.

[New Latin bahobab, possibly from North African Arabic *būḥibab, fruit of many seeds, from Arabic 'abū ḥibāb, source of seeds : 'ab, father, source; see ʔb in Semitic roots + ḥibāb, pl. of ḥabb, seed.]

baobab

(ˈbeɪəʊˌbæb)
n
(Plants) a bombacaceous tree, Adansonia digitata, native to Africa, that has a very thick trunk, large white flowers, and a gourdlike fruit with an edible pulp called monkey bread. Also called: bottle tree or monkey bread tree
[C17: probably from a native African word]

ba•o•bab

(ˈbeɪ oʊˌbæb, ˈbɑ oʊ-, ˈbaʊ bæb)

n.
a large tropical African tree, Adansoniadigitata, of the bombax family, that has an extremely thick trunk and bears a gourdlike fruit.
[1630–40; < New Latin bahobab]

ba·o·bab

(bā′ō-băb′)
An African tree having a large trunk, bulbous branches, and hard-shelled fruit with an edible pulp. The baobab has spongy wood that holds large amounts of water, and the bark can be used to make rope, mats, paper, and other items. Baobabs can live up to 3,000 years.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.baobab - African tree having an exceedingly thick trunk and fruit that resembles a gourd and has an edible pulp called monkey breadbaobab - African tree having an exceedingly thick trunk and fruit that resembles a gourd and has an edible pulp called monkey bread
monkey bread, sour gourd - African gourd-like fruit with edible pulp
Adansonia, genus Adansonia - baobab; cream-of-tartar tree
angiospermous tree, flowering tree - any tree having seeds and ovules contained in the ovary
Translations
apinanleipäpuubaobab
apabrauðstré
References in periodicals archive ?
There are a lot of Baobabs of different species, sizes, and ages across Madagascar, but the Alley of the Baobabs in Morondava is the only place where a number of 300-year old baobabs are in queue.
Most scholarly accounts assume that 'Arab traders' were responsible for introducing baobabs to this region but do not offer any reasons for their doing so.
Baobabs can attain a height of thirty metres, and grow to vast circumferences of up to forty-seven metres.
The baobabs are a stem-succulent tree native to the dry regions of tropical Africa, Australia and Madagascar but dispersed widely by human activities.
Known as the “Tree of Life” in Africa for its myriad uses, Baobabs are the dominant feature of the semi-arid savannah landscape.
One night the gods uprooted all baobabs and replanted them with their roots in the air so that the demons would die in the light of the rising sun.
Baobabs are among the world's hardiest trees, thriving in even the most arid of environments.
If the planet is very small and the baobabs are very numerous, they make it explode.
Standing tall on the sunburnt plains of Africa and Australia, like great living giants, baobabs may be the oldest life forms on the planet, and many of the specimens still standing today have been around for at least 2,000 years.
In African Hunter, Volume 18, Number 5, I reviewed Ralph Stutchbury's excellent book Elephant, and now I have been privileged to acquire a copy of his new companion volume, Baobab.