syllogism

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Related to Barbara syllogism: Syllogistic reasoning

syl·lo·gism

 (sĭl′ə-jĭz′əm)
n.
1. Logic A form of deductive reasoning consisting of a major premise, a minor premise, and a conclusion; for example, All humans are mortal, the major premise, I am a human, the minor premise, therefore, I am mortal, the conclusion.
2. Reasoning from the general to the specific; deduction.
3. A subtle or specious piece of reasoning.

[Middle English silogisme, from Old French, from Latin syllogismus, from Greek sullogismos, from sullogizesthai, to infer : sun-, syn- + logizesthai, to count, reckon (from logos, reason; see leg- in Indo-European roots).]

syllogism

(ˈsɪləˌdʒɪzəm)
n
1. (Logic) a deductive inference consisting of two premises and a conclusion, all of which are categorial propositions. The subject of the conclusion is the minor term and its predicate the major term; the middle term occurs in both premises but not the conclusion. There are 256 such arguments but only 24 are valid. Some men are mortal; some men are angelic; so some mortals are angelic is invalid, while some temples are in ruins; all ruins are fascinating; so some temples are fascinating is valid. Here fascinating, in ruins, and temples are respectively major, middle, and minor terms
2. (Logic) a deductive inference of certain other forms with two premises, such as the hypothetical syllogism,if P then Q; if Q then R; so if P then R
3. (Logic) a piece of deductive reasoning from the general to the particular
4. (Logic) a subtle or deceptive piece of reasoning
[C14: via Latin from Greek sullogismos, from sullogizesthai to reckon together, from sul- syn- + logizesthai to calculate, from logos a discourse]

syl•lo•gism

(ˈsɪl əˌdʒɪz əm)

n.
1. an argument of a form containing a major premise and a minor premise connected with a middle term and a conclusion, as “All A is C; all B is A; therefore, all B is C.”
2. deductive reasoning.
3. an extremely subtle, sophisticated, or deceptive argument.
[1350–1400; Middle English silogime < Old French < Latin syllogismus < Greek syllogismós=syllog- (see syllogize) + -ismos -ism]
syl`lo•gis′tic, syl`lo•gis′ti•cal, adj.
syl`lo•gis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

syllogism

a form of reasoning in which two propositions or premises are stated and a logical conclusion is drawn from them. Each premise has the subject-predicate form, and each shares a common element called the middle term.
See also: Logic
a form of reasoning in which two statements are made and a logical conclusion is drawn from them. See also logic. — syllogistic, adj.
See also: Argumentation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.syllogism - deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises
deductive reasoning, synthesis, deduction - reasoning from the general to the particular (or from cause to effect)
ratiocination, conclusion - the proposition arrived at by logical reasoning (such as the proposition that must follow from the major and minor premises of a syllogism)
major premise, major premiss - the premise of a syllogism that contains the major term (which is the predicate of the conclusion)
minor premise, minor premiss, subsumption - the premise of a syllogism that contains the minor term (which is the subject of the conclusion)
Translations
sylogismus
syllogisme
syllogism

syllogism

[ˈsɪlədʒɪzəm] Nsilogismo m

syllogism

nSyllogismus m

syllogism

[ˈsɪləˌdʒɪzm] nsillogismo