Barbary States


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Barbary States: Barbary Pirates

Barbary States

The North African states of Algeria, Tunisia, Tripoli, and Morocco, especially from the 16th to the 19th century.

Bar′bary States′


n.pl.
Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli, c1520–1830, when they were the refuge of pirates.
References in classic literature ?
But if he trended to the south he might reach Spain and the Barbary States.
The four Barbary states demanded payment for the right to enter the Mediterranean.
President George Washington asked for the ships in 1794 to force the Barbary States of North Africa to stop capturing American merchantmen and enslaving their crews.
Whether by the Barbary states, Somali pirates or the Israeli Navy, seizing a ship in international waters and abducting its crew and passengers is an act of piracy flagrantly violating international maritime law.
While the Caribbean proved fertile ground for piracy and privateering, the rampant extortion of commerce by pirates in the Mediterranean, operated by the independent Barbary States of Morocco, Tripoli, Algiers, and Tunis, was what first spurred the new United States to action.
This is incorrect because the Barbary States used the Quran to justify the enslaving/killing of American ship workers when we had no quarrel with them in the past.
They wrote among other issues about the 'infamous' Barbary States, Barbary wars, Christian captives and Tunisian foreign communities.
This was particularly apparent in President Jefferson's policy toward the Barbary states.
The uniform I wore with such pride--that made me instantly identifiable as someone special--meant little without the knowledge that other people wore that same uniform, of some form of it when they fought the Barbary States of North Africa, charged into hostile Confederate tire at Mobile Bay, and destroyed Nazi submarines and Japanese aircraft carriers when evil men were hell-bent on dominating the world.
The work details Barlow's actions securing temporary peace with the Barbary States, discusses in detail his dealing in France that helped the US in the War of 1812, and examines the personal and business acumen that made him one of the most important diplomats of the era.
In his introduction, he tells us all about the politics and economics of the Barbary States and the lives of slaves, and he asks some penetrating questions about Pitts' narrative.
The Barbary states consisted of the four North African states Morocco, Algiers, Tripoli, and Tunis.