Barking


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bark 1

 (bärk)
n.
1. The harsh sound uttered by a dog.
2. A sound, such as a cough, that is similar to a dog's bark.
v. barked, bark·ing, barks
v.intr.
1. To utter a bark.
2. To make a sound similar to a bark: "The birds bark softly, sounding almost like young pups" (Charleston SC News and Courier).
3. To speak sharply; snap: "a spot where you can just drop in ... without anyone's barking at you for failing to plan ahead" (Andy Birsh).
4. To work as a barker, as at a carnival.
v.tr.
To utter in a loud, harsh voice: The quarterback barked out the signals.
Idiom:
bark up the wrong tree
To misdirect one's energies or attention.

[From Middle English berken, to bark, from Old English beorcan.]

bark 2

 (bärk)
n.
1. The tough outer covering of the woody stems and roots of trees, shrubs, and other woody plants. It includes all tissues outside the vascular cambium.
2. A specific kind of bark used for a special purpose, as in tanning or medicine.
tr.v. barked, bark·ing, barks
1. To remove bark from (a tree or log).
2. To rub off the skin of; abrade: barked my shin on the car door.
3. To tan or dye (leather or fabric) by steeping in an infusion of bark.
4. To treat (a patient) using a medicinal bark infusion.

[Middle English, from Old Norse börkr.]

bark′y adj.

bark 3

also barque  (bärk)
n.
1. A sailing ship with from three to five masts, all of them square-rigged except the after mast, which is fore-and-aft rigged.
2. A small vessel that is propelled by oars or sails.

[Middle English barke, boat, from Old French barque, from Old Italian barca, from Latin; akin to Latin bāris, Egyptian flatbottom boat, from Greek, from Egyptian byr, br.]

barking

(ˈbɑːkɪŋ)
adj
mad; crazy
adv
(intensifier): barking mad.

Bar•king

(ˈbɑr kɪŋ)

n.
a borough of Greater London, England. 154,200.
Translations

barking

[ˈbɑːkɪŋ]
A. N [of dog] → ladrido m; [of fox] → aullido m
B. ADJ (Brit) barking (mad)chiflado, como una regadera

barking (mad)

adj (inf)total verrückt or übergeschnappt (inf), → völlig durchgeknallt (sl)

barking

[ˈbɑːkɪŋ] nabbaiare m
References in classic literature ?
The poor little houses lighted by kerosene lamps, the smoke from the chimneys mounting straight up into the clear air, the grunting of pigs, the women clad in cheap calico dresses and washing dishes in the kitchens, the footsteps of men coming out of the houses and going off to the stores and saloons of Main Street, the dogs barking and the children crying--all of these things made him seem, as he lurked in the darkness, oddly detached and apart from all life.
She heard the barking of an old dog that was chained to the sycamore tree.
The far-off barking of a dog, a lost shout, the indistinct murmur of some nearer watercourse--mere phantoms of sound--made the silence more irritating.
In the dead hush of midnight, he could even hear the barking of the watchdog from the opposite shore of the Hudson; but it was so vague and faint as only to give an idea of his distance from this faithful companion of man.
The old horse snorted and looked eagerly after them, and we young colts wanted to be galloping with them, but they were soon away into the fields lower down; here it seemed as if they had come to a stand; the dogs left off barking, and ran about every way with their noses to the ground.
Every day the police net would drag hundreds of them off the streets, and in the detention hospital you might see them, herded together in a miniature inferno, with hideous, beastly faces, bloated and leprous with disease, laughing, shouting, screaming in all stages of drunkenness, barking like dogs, gibbering like apes, raving and tearing themselves in delirium.
It was between one and two o'clock at night, as Cassy was returning from her ministrations to poor Tom, that she heard the sound of wild shrieking, whooping, halloing, and singing, from the sitting-room, mingled with the barking of dogs, and other symptoms of general uproar.
Then he descended, barking and coughing, and I followed.
This tramping back and forth is kept up nearly all the time, and is accented by the continuous slamming of the door, and the coughing and barking and sneezing of the crowd.
I was going to rush by and get away, but a lot of dogs jumped out and went to howl- ing and barking at me, and I knowed better than to move another peg.
Every stump that started up in their path seemed a man and an enemy, and made them catch their breath; and as they sped by some outlying cot- tages that lay near the village, the barking of the aroused watch-dogs seemed to give wings to their feet.
I did; whereupon began a heaving, stamping, clattering process, accompanied by a barking and baying which removed me effectually some yards' distance; but I would not be driven quite away till I saw the event.