Barocco


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Ba`roc´co


a.1.(Arch.) See Baroque.
References in classic literature ?
He was a muscular man with a high colour and silvery locks curling round his bald pate and over his ears, like a barocco apostle.
Earlier in the evening, the dark-haired beauty danced a corps role in Balanchine's Concerto Barocco, with a sharp attack that led into melting movements.
Becky Jones, assistant manager of upmarket Charles Street bar Barocco, added: "It's definitely getting more 'studenty' in the city centre.
Underwood was a 15-year-old apprentice with Portland's Oregon Ballet Theatre when she danced the Barocco solo in the company's annual school performance last year and a full company member when she performed in the ballet's corps in the fall.
Think of Balanchine's Concerto Barocco, Robbins' Fancy Free, or Taylor's Aureole--exquisite theatrical machines clicking joyously through time and space, giving music a different dimension and offering dancers the chance to be messengers of the heart.
This block is now occupied by Waterstone's, Wharton Place, Barocco and Lakeland
In 1996, after graduating from North Carolina School of the Arts, where former New York City Ballet star Melissa Hayden cast her in principal roles in Balanchine ballets like Concerto Barocco, she joined ABT.
I have a couple of favourites but these two remind me of the things that are most important to me, first a photo of me with my friends Danielis Brito and Irela Bravo, above, and me teaching salsa in Barocco bar in Cardiff.
The ballet, which hasn't been seen since it was in the repertoire of Twyla Tharp Dance in 1994, shares the stage at Kansas City's Lyric Theatre with two other gems: Robbins' Afternoon of a Faun and Balanchine's Concerto Barocco, February 24 to 27.
Cardiff's Barocco is dark and decadent, with a delicious menu to distinguish it from the city's other same old pub grub.
It comes in a bold cylindrical shape, matching the iconic Barocco with black shiny layers.
The show features a show-stopping Swan Lake (Act II), Merce Cunningham-inspired Patterns in Space, Go For Barocco, a satire on Balanchine's choreography and the UK premiere of Don Quixote.