basilica

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basilica
plan of the 4th-century ad
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome, Italy
A. apse
B. transept
C. nave
D. aisles
E. narthex
F. atrium

ba·sil·i·ca

 (bə-sĭl′ĭ-kə)
n.
1.
a. A public building of ancient Rome having a central nave with an apse at one or both ends and two side aisles formed by rows of columns, which was used as a courtroom or assembly hall.
b. A Christian church building of a similar design, having a nave with a semicircular apse, two or four side aisles, a narthex, and a clerestory.
2. Roman Catholic Church A church that has been accorded certain privileges by the pope.

[Latin, from Greek basilikē, from feminine of basilikos, royal, from basileus, king.]

ba·sil′i·can (-kən) adj.

basilica

(bəˈzɪlɪkə)
n
1. (Architecture) a Roman building, used for public administration, having a large rectangular central nave with an aisle on each side and an apse at the end
2. (Architecture) a rectangular early Christian or medieval church, usually having a nave with clerestories, two or four aisles, one or more vaulted apses, and a timber roof
3. (Architecture) a Roman Catholic church having special ceremonial rights
[C16: from Latin, from Greek basilikē hall, from basilikē oikia the king's house, from basileus king; see basil]
baˈsilican, baˈsilic adj

ba•sil•i•ca

(bəˈsɪl ɪ kə, -ˈzɪl-)

n., pl. -cas.
1. an early Christian or medieval church characterized by an oblong plan including a nave with a clerestory, two or four side aisles, one or more vaulted semicircular apses, and often a narthex and atrium.
2. one of the seven main churches of Rome or another Roman Catholic church accorded the same religious privileges.
3. (in ancient Rome) an oblong building with a double colonnade used as a court of law and public meeting place.
[1535–45; < Latin < Greek basilikḗ (oikía) literally, royal (house). See basil]
ba•sil′i•can, adj.

basilica

In classical architecture, a large rectangular Roman hall with colonnades and a semi-circular apse, used primarily as a court of law. By the fourth century, it was adapted as one of the basic plans for Christian churches in western architecture, as opposed to the cruciform plan adopted in Constantinople for the east.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.basilica - an early Christian church designed like a Roman basilicabasilica - an early Christian church designed like a Roman basilica; or a Roman Catholic church or cathedral accorded certain privileges; "the church was raised to the rank of basilica"
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
narthex - portico at the west end of an early Christian basilica or church
2.basilica - a Roman building used for public administration
Roman building - a building constructed by the ancient Romans
Translations
basilika

basilica

[bəˈzɪlɪkə] Nbasílica f

basilica

[bəˈzɪlɪkə] n (= church) → basilique f

basilica

nBasilika f

basilica

[bəˈzɪlɪkə] nbasilica
References in classic literature ?
Ruins and basilicas, palaces and colossi, set in the midst of a sordid present, where all that was living and warm-blooded seemed sunk in the deep degeneracy of a superstition divorced from reverence; the dimmer but yet eager Titanic life gazing and struggling on walls and ceilings; the long vistas of white forms whose marble eyes seemed to hold the monotonous light of an alien world: all this vast wreck of ambitious ideals, sensuous and spiritual, mixed confusedly with the signs of breathing forgetfulness and degradation, at first jarred her as with an electric shock, and then urged themselves on her with that ache belonging to a glut of confused ideas which check the flow of emotion.
Accordingly I spent the late hours either on the water(the moonlight of Venice is famous), or in the splendid square which serves as a vast forecourt to the strange old basilica of Saint Mark.
Whatever may be the carved and embroidered envelope of a cathedral, one always finds beneath it--in the state of a germ, and of a rudiment at the least--the Roman basilica.
The church of Saint-Paul has long needed a monstrance in keeping with the magnificence of that basilica, itself due to the Company of Jesus.
It is the first Holy Door outside Europe and only the seventh in the world: four are in major basilicas in Rome, one is in France and one is in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Spain.
Each of the four papal basilicas in Rome has a holy door, as do the cathedrals in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, and Ars-sur-Formans, France.
Basilicas were built throughout the Roman Empire, and there are many examples known from excavation, even though there are relatively few still standing and even fewer whose decoration survives even in part.
The building's architecture is characteristic of basilicas in general: interior colonnades divide the space, creating aisles or arcaded spaces on the sides; an apse on one end; the central aisle wider, with a higher ceiling than the side aisles; and a raised dais or platform for clergy.
When consecrated in September 1855, the Basilicas cost was placed at 125,000 [pounds sterling] sterling or approximately $600,000 (1855 dollars), which was principally raised by the Catholic population of the country of Newfoundland.
Yet the great temple/church (in which its reputed designer the Emperor Hadrian is supposed to have presided both as judge and god) gives some notion of what the other great public buildings of Rome and its provincial cities must have been like: the baths, the basilicas, the libraries, the markets.
After opening the Holy Door of St Peter's Basilica on Christmas Eve to usher in the Vatican's Holy Year, the Pope had opened the special doors of two other basilicas that pilgrims visit during the Holy Year to gain indulgences.