line of battle

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line of battle

n
(Military) a formation adopted by a military or naval force when preparing for action
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.line of battle - a line formed by troops or ships prepared to deliver or receive an attack
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
line - a fortified position (especially one marking the most forward position of troops); "they attacked the enemy's line"
salient - (military) the part of the line of battle that projects closest to the enemy
References in periodicals archive ?
Goodness knows how the boob became the battleline for modern motherhood - but it did.
Donald Devine is editor of the American Conservative Union Foundation's Conservative Battleline On Line.
Other programs include The Real West, Civil War Journal, True Action Adventures, Suicide Missions, Battleline, Desert Storm, Vietnam and Korean War: Fire & Ice.
The battleline that had been stalled for months was quickly crossed by the British and by November 9, they were in Jerusalem.
An able commander; despite his early ties to Mohammed and to Islam, he was never a religious zealot; at Qadisiya he incurred criticism for remaining on a rooftop behind the battleline, either from illness (as he said), cowardice, or to better observe and direct the battle (a combination of the first and third causes is most likely).
CINCFE also appreciated that he must gain time by deploying troops to lure the North Koreans into a conventional battleline.
Charles Hector d'Estaing in North American and Caribbean waters (July 1778-November 1779); won distinction in operations off Newport, Rhode Island (August 5-11, 1778), and led D'Estaing's battleline in Fantasque (64 guns) against Adm.
Asian Tariq Mahmood, 29, crossed a battleline to guide white pensioner Nora Stanton, 73, through street carnage on Saturday.
Smith's frequently used frontier motif is turned on its head, as the line between `savagery' and `civilisation' is no longer seen as a one-way, expansionist trajectory, but a contested battleline.
Labour wants to create a clear battleline for the next election where it is offering incentives to people to go green, while it can portray the Conservatives as penalising behaviour.
Think for a moment of the famous lines in Euripides' play, Medea, where Medea says that she would rather stand in the battleline three times than give birth once.
Battlelines are drawn with Labour's positive, approach at odds with the do-little Tories.