Bayezid II


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Bayezid II

(ˌbaɪjəˈziːd)
n
(Biography) ?1447–1512, sultan of Turkey; he greatly extended Turkish dominions in Greece and the Balkans
References in periodicals archive ?
Fuzuli began writing poetry at an early age, composing sometime around his twentieth year the important masnavi entitled Beng u Bade (Hashish and Wine), in which he compared the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid II to hashish and the Safavid shah Ismail I to wine, much to the advantage of the latter.
An immaculate astrolabe crafted in 1505-6 for the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid II recently sold at Sotheby's for $1.
Financial Consequences of Natural Disasters in Seventeenth-Century Anatolia: A Case Study of the Waqf of Bayezid II.
Among them are Ottoman-Mamluk relations and the complex image of Bayezid II, Venetians in the Levant in the age of Selim I, Egyptian civilian society and tax-farming in the aftermath of the Ottoman conquest, the Ottoman conquest and Egyptian culture, and the Ottoman conquest of Egypt and the arts.
Chapter three deals with Cem, a brother of Bayezid II who was compelled to flee the empire in 1482 and spent 13 years in Europe.
The Ottomans possessed a small navy as early as 1374, and under Mehmed II and Bayezid II (1481-1512) they acquired the common naval technology of the Mediterranean, adopting the oared galley as their principal vessel.
En los libros de texto de mi ninez --escritos por fervorosos nacionalistas que querian occidentalizar la joven Republica-- se decia que Cem Sultan estuvo abierto al arte y a Occidente y que fue un principe liberal y lleno de juventud, mientras que su hermano mayor, Bayezid II, que acabo envenenando a Cem, fue un fanatico que dio la espalda al mundo occidental.
Once again according to the legend, in the early sixteenth century, Sultan Bayezid II (1481-1512) invited Balim Sultan, the Bektashi leader at the time, to be his guest, and the Sultan himself with high officials of the court joined the Bektashi order.
Bayezid II Complex occupied the third forum, Tauri (Theodosius).
The fleet of Bayezid II (1481-1512), which forms a subject of Brummett's book, was no different from Mehmed's, except that it had a slightly longer range.